Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.287 Render date: 2021-12-04T20:44:25.481Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

58210 Perspectives and Guidance for Mobile Health Self-Management Intervention Developers from Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Illnesses: A Qualitative Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 March 2021

Caitlin S. Sayegh
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Ellen Iverson
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Clarissa Newman
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Diane Tanaka
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Ellen F. Olshansky
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work Department of Nursing and Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing at UCI
Clarisa Wijaya
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Marvin Belzer
Affiliation:
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

ABSTRACT IMPACT: The perspectives and guidance from adolescents and young adults (AYA) reported in this study could inform the evidence-based development and delivery of mobile health (mHealth) interventions to improve the health of AYA with chronic diseases. OBJECTIVES/GOALS: To elicit advice from AYA with chronic healthcare needs regarding if and how mHealth interventions could effectively promote illness self-management skills. We selected this goal because including the user perspective from the beginning of the design process could lead to greater future adoption. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: We purposively recruited AYA patients from a pediatric hospital with heterogeneous chronic illnesses to identify universal chronic disease views rather than condition-specific perspectives. We conducted qualitative face-to-face semi-structured interviews with (N = 19) AYA between 16 and 20 years old (63.2% Latinx; 21.1% Black; 10.5% White; 5.3% Multiracial). Using ATLAS.ti, three coders completed thematic analysis to inform a conceptual framework on how AYA believe mHealth interventions could promote the development and maintenance of self-management skills. Member checking was conducted over the phone to obtain participant feedback on themes to enhance the validity of qualitative results. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Results suggest that AYA develop self-management skills through several strategies, including 1) getting organized, 2) ‘making it work for me’ and 3) keeping the ‘right’ mentality. AYA described developing these strategies through: 1) receiving social support, 2) accessing helpful tools and technologies, and 3) going through a maturation process. They provided recommendations for how mHealth interventions could improve this process, including: 1) ‘what’ recommendations, describing the content or active ingredients that should be included in mHealth interventions, and 2) ‘how’ recommendations, describing the technological aspects or style in which the interventions should be delivered. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF FINDINGS: The results suggest that an appealing mHealth intervention could increase the support for AYA patients to proactively acquire self-management skills, avoiding trial-and-error or uneven access to guidance. Improving self-management could prevent poor health outcomes and increase quality of life.

Type
Digital Health/Social Media
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2021
You have Access
Open access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

58210 Perspectives and Guidance for Mobile Health Self-Management Intervention Developers from Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Illnesses: A Qualitative Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

58210 Perspectives and Guidance for Mobile Health Self-Management Intervention Developers from Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Illnesses: A Qualitative Study
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

58210 Perspectives and Guidance for Mobile Health Self-Management Intervention Developers from Adolescents and Young Adults with Chronic Illnesses: A Qualitative Study
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *