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4475 Meeting Partners Where They Are: Tailoring Community-Engaged Research Consultation Services

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2020

Adam Paberzs
Affiliation:
University of Michigan School of Medicine
Patricia Piechowski
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Jordan Poll
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Meghan Spiroff
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Karen Calhoun
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Ayse Buyuktur
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Athena McKay
Affiliation:
Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research
Donald Vereen
Affiliation:
Community-Based Public Health, University of Michigan
Susan Woolford
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Pediatrics
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/GOALS: One of the most significant challenges to community engagement experienced by Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) institutions is inadequate capacity of academic and community partners to engage in collaborative research. Several CTSAs within the consortium provide consultation services to help address this gap. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: For over 10 years, the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), a CTSA at the University of Michigan, has provided CEnR-specific consultations to partners seeking support for a variety of needs. Consultations can be requested for assistance with identifying potential partners, developing partnership infrastructure, finding CEnR funding opportunities, and incorporating CEnR approaches into research plans. When a consultation is requested, MICHR’s Community Engagement (CE) Program responds by planning a meeting with staff and faculty who have relevant skills, expertise, and connections. After the initial meeting, the CE Program provides follow-up communication and support based on the needs of the specific request, and often facilitates connections with potential partners. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: The two most frequent types of consultation requests involve 1) making connections with potential researchers or community partner organizations, and 2) providing guidance on research grant applications that involve community engagement. MICHR provides approximately 50 CEnR consultations each year, which have resulted in development of new partnerships, grant submissions, and research projects that utilize CEnR principles and address community-identified health priorities. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: This presentation will describe the evolution of MICHR’s CEnR consultation process and highlight successful outcomes and lessons learned over its 12-year history. CONFLICT OF INTEREST DESCRIPTION: NA

Type
Health Equity & Community Engagement
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2020
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