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3486 Sex Differences in the Effects of Severe Food Restriction on Electrolyte Balance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2019

Jonathas Fernandes Queiroz Almeida
Affiliation:
Georgetown - Howard Universities
Aline Souza
Affiliation:
Georgetown - Howard Universities
Hong Ji
Affiliation:
Georgetown - Howard Universities
Kathryn Sandberg
Affiliation:
Georgetown - Howard Universities
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: The goal of this study was to determine if there are any sex differences in the pathophysiological effects of sFR. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Male Fischer rats (4-month-old) were maintained on a control (CT) (ad libitum regular chow; n=8) or sFR (60% reduction of daily food intake, n=8) diet for 2 weeks. On days 1, 2, 3 and 14, the rats were placed in metabolic cages for food and water intake and 24-hour urine collection. Body weight (BW) is measured daily. After 2 weeks, the animals are given free access to normal chow for 3 months. Short-term and long-term effects of sFR on blood pressure and heart rate will be measured. RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: After 2 weeks, the male CT group gained 7% BW (p <0.05), while BW in the sFR males was reduced by 12% (p<0.05 vs. CT). In contrast, female controls did not gain BW while the sFR females lost 18% of their BW. Water intake was reduced by 35%, which was similar to the reduction in females (p=0.18). The hematocrit of sFR male rats was higher (51.1%) than the CT group (45.2%, p<0.05), which was most likely due to the 6% reduction in plasma volume. A similar effect on hematocrit was observed in sRF females. Similarly, also to female rats, sFR had no effect on Na+ and K+ plasma or urine concentrations by day 14 in the male rats. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: sFR has similar effects on electrolyte balance in males and females. Ongoing studies will determine if there is any sex difference in the effects of sFR on blood pressure, heart rate and susceptibility to hypertension and cardiac injury.

Type
Basic/Translational Science/Team Science
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2019
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