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3235 Acceptability of Robotic-Assisted Exercise Coaching in Diverse Youth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2019

Amelia Barwise
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic
Martha Bock
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Christine Hughes
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Joyce Balls-Berry
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Christi Patten
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
James Levine
Affiliation:
Case Western Reserve University
Chung-Il
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Tabetha Brockman
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Miguel Valdez Soto
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
Young Juhn
Affiliation:
Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN
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Abstract

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OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Approximately 80% of adolescents do not meet the current national guidelines of engaging in 60 minutes or more of physical activity daily. Physical activity is widely recognized as being beneficial for healthy growth as well as important for good mental health and fitness. Interventions are needed that promote and encourage physical activity among this population to reduce the risk of obesity and to encourage maintenance of a healthy weight. Since adolescents enjoy digital technologies, robotic-assisted platforms might be a novel, innovative and engaging mechanism to deliver physical activity interventions. The objective of this study was to assess the potential acceptability of robotic-assisted exercise coaching among diverse youth. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: This was a pilot study that used a cross-sectional survey design. Adolescents ages 12-17 were recruited at 3 community-based sites. We obtained written informed consent from participants’ parents and guardians as well as assent from participants. We demonstrated the robotic system human interface (also known as the robotic human trainer) to groups of adolescents. We delivered the exercise coaching in real time via an iPad tablet placed atop a mobile robotic wheel base and controlled remotely by the coach using an iOS device or computer. After the demonstration participants were asked to complete a 28- item survey that included questions about socio demographics, smoking history, weight, exercise habits, and depression history. The survey also included the 8- item Technology Acceptance Scale (TAS). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Participants (N = 190) were 55% (103/189) male, 43% (81/190) racial minority, 6% (11/190) Hispanic, and 28% (54/190) lived in a lower-income community. The mean age of participants was 15.0 years (SD=2.0). Approximately 25% (47/190) of participants met national recommendations for physical activity. Their mean body mass index (BMI) was 21.8(SD_4.0) kg/m2. Of note, 18% (35/190) had experienced depression now or in the past. The mean Technology Acceptance Scale (TAS) total score was 32.8 (SD 7.8) of a possible score of 40, indicating high potential receptivity to the technology. No significant associations were detected between TAS score and gender, age, racial minority status, median income of participant’s neighborhood, BMI, meeting national recommendations for physical activity levels, or depression history. Of interest, 68% (129/190) of participants agreed that they and their friends were likely to use the robot to help them exercise. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: This pilot survey study demonstrated that among a racially and socioeconomically diverse group of adolescents, robotic-assisted exercise coaching is likely acceptable. The discovery that all demographic groups represented in this sample had similarly high receptivity to the robotic human exercise trainer is encouraging for ultimate considerations of intervention scalability and reach among diverse adolescent populations. Next steps include a study to assess the impact of robotic-assisted exercise coaching on adolescents’ exercise and health outcomes.

Type
Health Equity & Community Engagement
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2019
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