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3209 Hepatitis C Virus Linked To Increased Mortality in Inmates Who Are Hospitalized

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 March 2019

Alysse G Wurcel
Affiliation:
Tufts University
Deirdre Burke
Affiliation:
Tufts Medical Center
Karen Freund
Affiliation:
Tufts University
Curt Beckwith
Affiliation:
Brown University
John Wong
Affiliation:
Tufts University
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has a high prevalence among individuals in jail and prisons. Access to HCV treatment has been restricted in jails and prisons. We hypothesized that HCV infection in inmates would be associated with increased mortality in people who were hospitalized while incarcerated. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: We created and then linked a database of people who were incarcerated and admitted at Lemuel Shattuck Hospital (2004, 2008, 2011) to the Massachusetts Vital Statistic Registry (updated through end of 2015). Death was classified using the Automatic Classification of Medical Entry Death Code. The primary outcome of interest was mortality within 1 year of hospitalization, and the secondary outcome was mortality at any time. The primary indicator of interest was HCV, defined as the presence of the ICD-9 code for HCV on discharge. Covariates included in univariate and multivariate modeling included age, year of admission, and race/ethnicity classified as: White, Black, Hispanic or Other (i.e., Asian, Native American, Multi-Racial, or No answer). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: Of the 1,541 hospital admissions, 21% had HCV, and 57% were white, 22% black, 8% Hispanic and 12% other. Of the 273 total deaths (18% of cohort), 82 deaths occurred within 1 year of hospitalization (5.3% of the entire cohort, 30% of all deaths). The primary cause of death was vascular (21%), followed by chronic liver disease (18%), cancer (17%), overdose/suicide/trauma (19%), pulmonary (7%) and infection (6%). People with HCV were more likely to die of chronic liver disease (40% vs 7%, p<0.001). In the multivariable adjusted model, people with HCV were more likely to die within 1 year of hospitalization (HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.02, 2.49) and more likely to die at any time (HR 1.38, 95% CI 1.06, 1.79). Age, race and gender were not associated with risk of death. Compared to 2004, people admitted in 2008 (HR 2.05, 95% CI, 1.50-2.80) and 2011 (HR 4.02, 95% CI 2.77, 5.83) were more likely to die within 1 year. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: Despite advances in HCV treatment in the community, HCV in inmates is associated with increased mortality.

Type
Translational Science, Policy, & Health Outcomes Science
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2019
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