Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-8tjh8 Total loading time: 0.178 Render date: 2021-10-18T20:52:29.665Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2289

Will the Veteran Affairs (VA) electronic medical records (EMR) database reveal a signal that angiotensin II inhibiting medications ameliorate depression?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 May 2018

Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

OBJECTIVES/SPECIFIC AIMS: Angiotensin type 1 receptor blockers (ARBs) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) are frequently prescribed for hypertension and associated cardiovascular and renal complications. In animal models, these drugs also reduce anxiety and depression. OBJECTIVE—to determine if Veteran Affairs (VA) clinical pharmacy data indicate a protective effect of ARBs and/or ACEIs for major depression. METHODS/STUDY POPULATION: Pharmacy records from nationwide VA electronic medical records (EMR) were extracted for patients prescribed ARBs, ACEIs, α-blockers, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics (n=4,081,359). Patients were excluded if: they had not received medications for 6 months with >70% coverage; were diagnosed with substance/alcohol abuse, dementia, psychosis, schizophrenia, or prescribed insulin. The study population was categorized as “ARB/ACEI” (A/A) or “Never ARB/ACEI” (NA/A). Using the Greedy Matching Algorithm, subjects were matched on a 1:1 ratio for sex and race over a 5 year age range resulting in 2 equal groups of n=1,350,236 each. Subjects were older (M=71.6, SD=12) and mostly men (97%). RESULTS/ANTICIPATED RESULTS: In the A/A Versus NA/A, respectively, the incidence of anti-depressant use was greater during (9.9% vs. 8.9%) but was lower after (11.8% vs. 12.2%) the study period. PHQ-2 scores (Mean±SD) were statistically lower, albeit similar, during (0.79±1.56 vs. 0.85±1.63) and after (1.00±1.73 vs. 1.07±1.79) the study period. DISCUSSION/SIGNIFICANCE OF IMPACT: These preliminary data suggest that inhibiting angiotensin II action does not provide a protective effect on major depression when compared with other classes of antihypertensive drugs. This study illustrates how “Big Data” may inform the design, or obviate the need, for large-scale randomized-controlled trials.

Type
Biomedical Informatics/Health Informatics
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
© The Association for Clinical and Translational Science 2018
You have Access
Open access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

2289
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

2289
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

2289
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *