Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-n9pbb Total loading time: 0.162 Render date: 2021-09-19T10:29:26.686Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Annotation: Repetitive Behaviour in Autism: A Review of Psychological Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 September 1999

Michelle Turner
Affiliation:
University of Durham, U.K.
Get access

Abstract

Repetitive behaviour is widely known to be one of three core and defining features of autism (ICD-10, World Health Organisation, 1990; DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994). Any clinician who is told that a child repetitively flaps his arms, spends hours lining up Lego bricks, will not tolerate changes in routine, and has a peculiar fascination with the many varieties of electric fan available on the market will, before hearing anything about the social functioning or communicative abilities of that child, be deeply suspicious that the child is autistic. However, the literature on repetitive behaviour in autism reveals several paradoxes and inconsistencies. First, given the significant challenge that this class of behaviour can pose, the literature devoted to the study of this behaviour in autism is relatively small in comparison with the extensive literature on other aspects of autistic symptomatology. Whilst certain classes of repetitive behaviour have been described as nonspecific to autism (e.g. Prior & Macmillan, 1973), others have been suggested to be of particular significance to the disorder (e.g. U. Frith, 1989; Kanner, 1943; Wing & Gould, 1979). Finally, although repetitive behaviour is commonly defined as behaviour with no obvious goal or function (e.g. Hutt & Hutt, 1970), much of the literature concerning repetitive behaviour in autism has sought to explore what function this behaviour serves.

The aim of this Annotation is to provide a review of what is known about repetitive behaviour in autism, its specificity to the syndrome, and the functions or mechanisms that might underlie this behaviour at the psychological level.

Type
Annotation
Copyright
© 1999 Association for Child Psychology and Psychiatry

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Annotation: Repetitive Behaviour in Autism: A Review of Psychological Research
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Annotation: Repetitive Behaviour in Autism: A Review of Psychological Research
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Annotation: Repetitive Behaviour in Autism: A Review of Psychological Research
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *