Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-lv79x Total loading time: 0.404 Render date: 2021-10-27T10:07:18.034Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Underlying manifestations of developmental phonological disorders in French-speaking pre-schoolers*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 November 2016

FRANÇOISE BROSSEAU-LAPRÉ*
Affiliation:
Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA
SUSAN RVACHEW
Affiliation:
School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada and Center for Research on Brain, Language & Music, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
*
Address for correspondence: Françoise Brosseau-Lapré, Purdue University – Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, 715 Clinic Drive, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907, United States. e-mail: fbrossea@purdue.edu

Abstract

This study examined the psycholinguistic profiles of Quebec French-speaking children with developmental phonological disorders (DPD). The purpose was to determine whether the endophenotypes that have been identified in English-speaking children with DPD are similarly associated with speech impairment in French-speaking children. Seventy-two children with DPD and ten children with normally developing speech, aged four to six years, received a comprehensive assessment battery that included measures at the phenotype level (i.e. measures of overt speech production skills) and endophenotype level (i.e. measures of potential underlying core deficits such as phonological processing or oral motor impairments). The majority of the children with DPD presented with a psycholinguistic profile indicative of difficulties with phonological processing. Phonological processing skills also explained unique variance in speech production accuracy, indicating that French-speaking children with DPD, who produce different surface speech errors than English-speaking children with DPD, are nonetheless very similar with regards to their underlying psycholinguistic profile.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

[*]

We thank the children and their parents who generously agreed to participate in the study, as well as the research assistants, speech-language pathologists, and speech-language pathology students who were part of the project. We also wish to thank Dr Lawrence Shriberg for providing the stimuli for the Syllable Repetition Task and for his assistance with the SRT data analysis. This research was supported by a Standard Research Grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to the second author and a Bourse de formation de doctorat from the Fonds de recherche en santé du Québec to the first author. The Centre for Research on Brain, Language & Music is funded by the Government of Quebec via the Fonds de Recherche Nature et Technologies and Société et Culture. The research consists of a portion of the first author's PhD, supervised by the second author.

References

Adda-Decker, M., Boula de Mareüil, P., Adda, G. & Lamel, L. (2005). Investigating syllabic structures and their variation in spontaneous French. Speech Communication 46, 119–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anthony, J. L., Greenblatt Aghara, R., Dunkelberger, M. J., Anthony, T. I., Williams, J. M. & Zhang, Z. (2011). What factors place children with speech sound disorders at risk for reading problems? American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 20, 146–60.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bérubé, D., Bernhardt, B. M. & Stemberger, J. P. (2013). Un test de phonologie du français : construction et utilisation. Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 37, 2640.Google Scholar
Betz, S. K. & Stoel-Gammon, C. (2005). Measuring articulatory error consistency in children with developmental apraxia of speech. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 19, 5366.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bird, J., Bishop, D. V. M. & Freeman, N. H. (1995). Phonological awareness and literacy development in children with expressive phonological impairments. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 38, 446–62.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bishop, D. V. M. (2009). Genes, cognition, and communication: insights from neurodevelopmental disorders. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1156, 118.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bishop, K. & Minor-Corriveau, M. (2015). Les processus phonologiques impliquant les groupes consonantiques en position initiale et finale: une étude sur l'articulation et la phonologie chez des enfants francophones et bilingues du nord de l'Ontario. Actes de l'ACFAS, 21e Journée des sciences et savoir, Dir. Jaouad Alem et Abdelouahid Assaïdi, 21–61.Google Scholar
Bradford, A. & Dodd, B. (1996). Do all speech disordered children have motor deficits? Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 10, 77101.Google Scholar
Broomfield, J. & Dodd, B. (2004). The nature of referred subtypes of primary speech disability. Child Language and Teaching Therapy 20(2), 135–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brosseau-Lapré, F. & Rvachew, S. (2008). Test de Conscience Phonologique (Unpublished Test). Montreal: McGill University.Google Scholar
Brosseau-Lapré, F. & Rvachew, S. (2014). Cross-linguistic comparison of speech errors produced by English- and French-speaking preschool-age children with developmental phonological disorders. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 16(2), 98108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Crystal, D. (1995). The Cambridge encyclopedia of the English language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Di Cristo, A. (1999). Le cadre accentuel du français contemporain: essai de modélisation partiel. Langues 2, 184205.Google Scholar
Dispaldro, M., Leonard, L. B. & Deevy, P. (2013). Real-word and nonword repetition in Italian-speaking children with specific language impairment: a study of diagnostic accuracy. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 56, 323–36.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dodd, B. (1995). Procedures for classification of subgroups of speech disorder. In Dodd, B. (ed.), The differential diagnoses and treatment of children with speech disorder, 4964. San Diego, CA: Singular.Google Scholar
Dunn, L. M. & Dunn, L. M. (1981). Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test-Revised. Circle Pines, MN: American Guidance Service.Google Scholar
Dunn, L. M., Theriault-Whalen, C. & Dunn, L. M. (1993). Échelle de vocabulaire en images Peabody. Toronto: Psycan.Google Scholar
Edwards, J., Fox, R. A. & Rogers, C. L. (2002). Final consonant discrimination in children: effects of phonological disorder, vocabulary size, and articulatory accuracy. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 45, 231–42.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Forrest, K. (2003). Diagnostic criteria of developmental apraxia of speech used by clinical speech-language pathologists. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 12, 376–80.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gibbon, F. E. (1999). Undifferentiated lingual gestures in children with articulation/phonological disorders. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 42, 382–97.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goozée, J. V., Murdoch, B., Ozanne, A., Cheng, Y., Hill, A. & Gibbon, F. (2007). Lingual kinematics and coordination in speech-disordered children exhibiting differentiated versus undifferentiated lingual gestures. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 42, 703–24.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hart, B. & Risley, T. (1992). American parenting of language-learning children: persisting differences in family–child interactions observed in natural home environments. Developmental Psychology 28, 1096–105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hesketh, A. (2004). Early literacy achievement of children with a history of speech problems. International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders 39, 453–68.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaufman, A. S. & Kaufman, N. L. (2004). Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test, 2nd ed. San Antonio, TX: PsychCorp.Google Scholar
Larrivee, L. S. & Catts, H. W. (1999). Early reading achievement in children with expressive phonological disorders. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 8, 118–28.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewis, B. A., Avrich, A. A., Freebairn, L. A., Hansen, A. J., Sucheston, L. E., Kuo, I., … Stein, C. M. (2011). Literacy outcomes of children with early childhood speech sound disorders: impact of endophenotypes. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 54, 1628–43.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewis, B. A., Freebairn, L. A., Hansen, A. J., Iyengar, S. K. & Taylor, H. G. (2004). School-age follow-up of children with childhood apraxia of speech. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools 35, 122–40.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewis, B. A., Shriberg, L. D., Freebairn, L. A., Hansen, A. J., Stein, C. M., Taylor, H. G. & Iyengar, S. K. (2006). The genetic bases of speech sound disorders: evidence from spoken and written language. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 49, 1294–312.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lof, G. L. & Watson, M. W. (2008). A nationwide survey of nonspeech oral motor exercise use: implications for evidence-based practice. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools 39, 392407.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
MacLeod, A. A. N., Sutton, A., Trudeau, N. & Thordardottir, E. (2011). The acquisition of consonants in Québécois French: a cross-sectional study of pre-school-aged children. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 13, 93109.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mancini, F. & Voghera, M. (1994). Lunghezza, tipi di sillabe e accento in Italiano. In De Mauro, T. (ed.), Come parlano gli Italiani [How Italians speak], 211–41. Firenze: La Nuova Italia.Google Scholar
Morgan, A. (2013). Speech-language pathology insights into genetics and neuroscience: beyond surface behavior. International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 15, 245–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morley, M. (1957). The development and disorders of speech in childhood. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.Google Scholar
Munson, B., Baylis, A. L., Krause, M. O. & Yim, D. (2010). Representation and access in phonological impairment. In Fougerón, C., Kühnert, B., Imperio, M. & Vallée, N. (eds), Laboratory phonology 10, 381404. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Munson, B., Edwards, J. & Beckman, M. E. (2005). Relationships between nonword repetition accuracy and other measures of linguistic development in children with phonological disorders. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 48, 6178.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray, E., McCabe, P., Heard, R. & Ballard, K. J. (2015). Differential diagnosis of children with suspected childhood apraxia of speech. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 58(1), 4360.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Paul, M. (2009). Predictors of consonant development and the development of a test of French phonology. Unpublished MSc thesis, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec.Google Scholar
Paul, M. & Rvachew, S. (2008). Test Francophone de Phonologie (Unpublished Test). Montreal: McGill University.Google Scholar
Pennington, B. F. (2006). From single to multiple deficit models of developmental disorders. Cognition 101, 385413.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pennington, B. F. & Bishop, D. V. M. (2009). Relations among speech, language, and reading disorders. Annual Review of Psychology 60, 283306.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Preston, J. L. & Edwards, M. L. (2007). Phonological processing skills of adolescents with residual speech sound errors. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools 38, 297308.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Preston, J. L. & Koenig, L. (2011). Phonetic variability in residual speech sound disorders: exploration of subtypes. Topics in Language Disorders 31, 168–84.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Raitano, N. A., Pennington, B. F., Tunick, R. A., Boada, R. & Shriberg, L. D. (2004). Pre-literacy skills of subgroups of children with speech sound disorders. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 45, 821–35.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ramus, F., Marshall, C. R., Rosen, S. & van der Lely, K. J. (2013). Phonological deficits in specific language impairment and developmental dyslexia: towards a multidimensional model. Brain 136, 630–45.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rvachew, S. & Brosseau-Lapré, F. (2012). Developmental phonological disorders: foundations of clinical practice. San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing, Co.Google Scholar
Rvachew, S. & Brosseau-Lapré, F. (2015). A randomized trial of twelve week interventions for the treatment of developmental phonological disorder in francophone children. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology 24(4), 637–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rvachew, S., Chiang, P. Y. & Evans, N. (2007). Characteristics of speech errors produced by children with and without delayed phonological awareness skills. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools 38, 6071.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rvachew, S. & Grawburg, M. (2006). Correlates of phonological awareness in preschoolers with speech sound disorders. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 49, 7487.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rvachew, S., Leroux, É. & Brosseau-Lapré, F. (2014). Production of word-initial consonant sequences by francophone preschoolers with a developmental phonological disorder. Canadian Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology 37(4), 252–67.Google Scholar
Sahlén, B., Reuterskiöld-Wagner, C., Nettelbladt, U. & Radeborg, K. (1999). Language comprehension and nonword repetition in children with language impairment. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics 13(5), 369–80.Google Scholar
Schooling, T. L. (2003). Lessons from the National Outcomes Measurement System (NOMS). Seminars in Speech and Language 24(3), 245–56.Google Scholar
Shriberg, L. D. (1994). Five subtypes of developmental phonological disorders. Clinics in Communication Disorders 4, 3853.Google ScholarPubMed
Shriberg, L. D., Austin, D., Lewis, B. A., McSweeny, J. L. & Wilson, D. L. (1997). The Speech Disorders Classification System (SDCS): extensions and lifespan reference data. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 40, 723–40.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shriberg, L. D., Fourakis, M., Hall, S. D., Karlsson, H. B., Lohmeier, H. L., McSweeny, J. L., … Wilson, D. L. (2010). Extensions to the Speech Disorders Classification System (SDSC). Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 24, 795824.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shriberg, L. D., Lewis, B. A., Tomblin, J. B., McSweeny, J. L., Karlsson, H. B. & Scheer, A. R. (2005). Towards diagnostic and phenotype markers for genetically transmitted speech delay. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 48, 834–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shriberg, L. D. & Lohmeier, H. L. (2008). The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT) [Technical Report No. 14]. Madison, WI: Waisman Center.Google Scholar
Shriberg, L. D., Lohmeier, H. L., Campbell, T. F., Dollaghan, C. A., Green, J. R. & Moore, C. A. (2009). A nonword repetition task for speakers with misarticulations: the Syllable Repetition Task (SRT). Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research 52, 1189–212.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shriberg, L. D., Lohmeier, H. L., Strand, E. A. & Jakielski, K. J. (2012). Encoding, memory, and transcoding deficits in Childhood Apraxia of Speech. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 26, 445–82.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, S. D., Pennington, B. F., Boada, R. & Shriberg, L. D. (2005). Linkage of speech sound disorder to reading disability loci. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 46, 1057–66.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Statistics Canada (2012). Visual Census. 2011 Census. Ottawa. Released 24 October 2012. Online <http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/vc-rv/index.cfm?Lang=ENG&TOPIC_ID=4&GEOCODE=462> (last accessed 28 May 2015).+(last+accessed+28+May+2015).>Google Scholar
St Louis, K. O. & Ruscello, D. (2000). Oral Speech Mechanism Screening Examination, 3rd ed. Austin, TX: Pro-Ed.Google Scholar
Stokes, S. F., Kern, S. & Dos Santos, C. (2012). Extended Statistical Learning as an account for slow vocabulary growth. Journal of Child Language 39(1), 105–29.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thoonen, G., Maassen, B., Gabreels, F. & Schreuder, R. (1999). Validity of maximum performance tasks to diagnose motor speech disorders in children. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 13, 123.Google Scholar
Van Riper, C. (1978 [1939]). Speech correction: principles and methods, 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Walker, D. (2001). French sound structure. Calgary: University of Calgary Press.Google Scholar
Wilcox, M. J., Gray, S. L., Guimond, A. B. & Lafferty, A. E. (2011). Efficacy of the TELL language and literacy curriculum for preschoolers with developmental speech and/or language impairments. Early Childhood Research Quarterly 26, 278–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Underlying manifestations of developmental phonological disorders in French-speaking pre-schoolers*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Underlying manifestations of developmental phonological disorders in French-speaking pre-schoolers*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Underlying manifestations of developmental phonological disorders in French-speaking pre-schoolers*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *