Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-x5mqb Total loading time: 0.228 Render date: 2021-12-02T19:45:35.237Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Mothers' use of fantasy in speech to young children*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 September 2008

Robert D. Kavanaugh
Affiliation:
Williams College
Sue Whittington
Affiliation:
Williams College
Mark J. Cerbone
Affiliation:
Williams College

Abstract

This study examined mothers' use of fantasy in speech to young children. Observations of mothers in free-play interactions with their 12-to 27-month-old children formed the basis for an analysis of the frequency and type of fantasy relationships encoded in maternal speech. Results suggested that fantasy speech to roughly year-old children was relatively infrequent and restricted to descriptions of the feelings, actions, and functions of animate and inanimate objects. Speech to 1½-year-olds encoded essentially the same fantasy characteristics, but mothers of children in this age group introduced more distinct instances in their fantasy talk. A more notable change occurred in the fantasy utterances directed to 2-year-olds. Mothers of these children talked about non-existent imaginary objects, and often asked the child to extend a play episode by providing a new fantasy element. These findings were discussed in terms of the nature and function of the dyadic interactions in which mothers' fantasy talk occurred.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

[*]

Portions of this paper were presented at the meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Boston, April 1981. Address for correspondence: Robert D. Kavanaugh, Department of Psychology, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267.

References

Brown, R. (1973). A first language: the early stages. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bruner, J. S. (1978). Acquiring the uses of language. CanJPsych 32. 204–18.Google ScholarPubMed
Cross, T. G. (1979). Mothers' speech adjustments and language learning. LangSci 1. 325.Google Scholar
Dunn, J. & Wooding, C. (1977). Play at home and its implications for learning. In Tizard, B.. & Harvey, D.. (eds), Biology of play. London: Heinemann.Google Scholar
Fein, G. (1975). A transformational analysis of pretending. DevPsych 11. 291–6.Google Scholar
Furrow, D., Nelson, K. & Benedict, H. (1979). Mothers' speech to children and syntactic development: some simple relationships. JChLang 6. 423–42.Google ScholarPubMed
Garnica, O. K. (1978). Non-verbal concomitants oflanguage input to children. In Waterson, N.. & Snow, C.. (eds), The development of communication. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Garvey, C. (1977). Play. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Gleason, J. B. (1977). Talking to children: some notes on feedback. In Snow, C. E.. & Ferguson, C. A.. (eds), Talking to children: language input and acquisition. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Lodge, K. R. (1979). The use of past tense in games of pretend. JChLang 6. 365–9.Google Scholar
Nelson, K. E. (1977). Recasts and the introduction of new syntactic forms into the child's language. Paper presented at the Boston University Conference on Child Language,Boston, September.Google Scholar
Newport, E. (1977). Motherese: the speech of mothers to young children. In Castellan, N.., Pisoni, D.. & Potts, G.. (eds), Cognitive theory, Vol. 2. Hillsdale, N.J.: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Nicolich, L. M. (1977). Beyond sensorimotor intelligence: assessments of symbolic maturity through pretend play. MPQ 23. 89101.Google Scholar
Piaget, J. (1962). Play, dreams, and imitation in childhood. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
Ratner, N. K. & Bruner, J. S. (1978). Games, social exchange and the acquisition of language. JChLang 5. 391401.Google ScholarPubMed
Sachs, J. (1980). The role of adult–child play in language development. New Directions in Child Development 9. 3347.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sachs, J. & Johnson, M. L. (1976). Language development in a hearing child of deaf parents. In von Raffier-Engel, W. & Lebrun, Y.. (eds), Baby talk and infant speech. Lisse: Swets & Zeitlinger.Google Scholar
Sachs, J. & Truswell, L. (1978). Comprehension of two-word instructions by children in the one-word stage. JChLang 5. 1724.Google Scholar
Snow, C. E. (1977). The development of conversation between mothers and babies. JChLang 4. 122.Google Scholar
Soderbergh, R. (1980). Story-telling, dramatic role play and displaced speech in play with dolls. FirstLang 1. 209–22.Google Scholar
Vorster, J. (1975). Mommy linguist: the case for motherese. Lingua 37. 281312.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Mothers' use of fantasy in speech to young children*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Mothers' use of fantasy in speech to young children*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Mothers' use of fantasy in speech to young children*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *