Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-h2zp4 Total loading time: 0.374 Render date: 2021-09-18T05:36:27.998Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Lexical assignability and perspective switch: the acquisition of verb subcategorization for aspectual inflections*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

Matthew Rispoli*
Affiliation:
Bureau of Child Research, University of Kansas
*Corresponding
Juniper Gardens Language Project, Gateway Center Tower II, Suite 830, Fourth and State, Kansas City, KS 66101, USA.

Abstract

This paper explores how children learn the range of aspect inflections to which a verb is amenable. The data considered are from observations of three Japanese boys aged between 1; 10 and 2; 1. Analyses focus on the children's mastery of Aktionsart specific intersentential patterns. For example, in one pattern, a caregiver asks nani shiteiru? ‘What is someone or something doing’. The conventional answer is with the continuative -te iru form of a verb that expresses an activity. Three conclusions are drawn. First, lexical assignment had begun before aspectual inflections were used to signal temporal perspective switch. Secondly, lexical assignment began with anchorpoints tying certain lexical contrasts to the Aktionsart of minimal sentences. Thirdly, overgeneralizations of aspect inflections are due to the difficulty of acquiring devices that signal temporal perspective switch.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

This research was supported by a National Research Service Award, T32HD07181–08. The author thanks Pat Clancy, Dan Slobin, Cecil Toupin and Robert Van Valin for comments and criticisms of this work. The author also thanks Betty Hart and the JGLP for aid in preparing this manuscript, and Patricia Clancy for her generous contribution of data to this study. Errors are the sole responsibility of the author.

References

Antinucci, F. & Miller, R. (1976). How children talk about what happened. Journal of Child Language 3. 167–89.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, R. (1973). A First Language. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clancy, P. (1985). The acquisition of Japanese. In Slobin, D. I. (ed.), The crosslinguistic study of language acquisition. Hillsdale NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Cziko, G. & Koda, K. (1987). A Japanese child's use of stative and punctual verbs. Journal of Child Language 14. 99111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dowty, D. (1977). Towards a semantic analysis of verb aspect and the English imperfective progressive. Linguistics and Philosophy 1. 4577.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Foley, W. & Van Valin, R. (1984). Functional syntax and universal grammar. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Horiguchi, S. (1981). Nenshooyoo no aspecto. In Hori, M. & Peng, F. (eds), Aspects of language acquisition: gengo shuutoku no shosoo. Hiroshima: Bunka Hyoron.Google Scholar
Lys, F. & Mommer, K. (1986). The problem of aspectual classification: a two-level approach. Papers from the Fifth Regional Meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society. 216–30.Google Scholar
Mapstone, E. & Harris, P. (1985). Is the English present progressive unique? Journal of Child Language 12. 433–41.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Noji, J. (1976). Yojiki no gengo seikatsu no jittai. Vols 1–4. Hiroshima: Bunka Hyoron.Google Scholar
Okubo, A. (1967). Yooji gengo no hattatsu. Tokyo: Tookyoodoo.Google Scholar
Rispoli, M. (1981). The emergence of verb and adjective tense-aspect inflections in Japanese. Unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
Slobin, D. (1985). Crosslinguistic evidence for the language-making capacity. In Slobin, D. (ed.), The Crosslinguistic study of language acquisition. Vol. 2. Hillsdale: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Smith, C. (1983). A theory of aspectual choice. Language 59. 479501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, C. & Weist, R. (1987). On the temporal contour of child language: a reply to Rispoli & Bloom. Journal of Child Language 14, 387–92.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Soga, M. (1983). Tense and aspect in modern colloquial Japanese. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press.Google Scholar
Talmy, L. (1985). Lexicalization patterns: semantic structure in lexical form. In Shopen, T. (ed.), Language typology and syntactic description. Vol. 3: Grammatical categories and the lexicon. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
Vendler, Z. (1967). Linguistics in philosophy. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Wakabayashi, S. (1981). Early stages in the acquisition of Japanese as a first language. Unpublished M.A. thesis, University of York, Canada.Google Scholar
Weist, R., Wysocka, H., Witkowska-Stadnik, K., Buczowska, E. & Konieczna, E. (1984). The defective tense hypothesis: on the emergence of tense and aspect in child Polish. Journal of Child Language 11. 347–74.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yamada, A. (1980). The development of syntactic devices for communication in the early stages of the acquisition of Japanese: a case study. Unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Hawaii.Google Scholar
8
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lexical assignability and perspective switch: the acquisition of verb subcategorization for aspectual inflections*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Lexical assignability and perspective switch: the acquisition of verb subcategorization for aspectual inflections*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Lexical assignability and perspective switch: the acquisition of verb subcategorization for aspectual inflections*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *