Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-lkb8j Total loading time: 0.205 Render date: 2022-01-18T21:20:20.993Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Children learn from speech not addressed to them: the case of personal pronouns*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 February 2009

Yuriko Oshima-Takane*
Affiliation:
McGill University
*
Department of Psychology, McGill University, 1205 Dr. Penfield Avenue, Montreal, P.Q., CanadaH3A 1B1.

Abstract

A modelling experiment was conducted to determine if children would benefit from observing speech not addressed to them in discovering the correct use of first and second pronouns. Imitative behaviours of 18 English-speaking children who were about to learn personal pronouns were analysed under two modelling conditions. The non-addressee condition provided the child with systematic opportunities to observe the parents saying me/you with pointing actions directed towards each other as well as the parents saying me/you with pointing action directed towards the child. The addressee condition provided the child only with systematic opportunities to observe the parents saying me/you with pointing actions directed towards the child. Only children in the non-addressee condition imitated their parents' pointing actions and use of me/you without errors, suggesting that even children under two years old can attend to and can learn from speech not addressed to them.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

This research was supported by a Doctoral fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada to Yuriko Oshima-Takane, by a McGill University Social Sciences Research Grant to Dr John Macnamara, and by grant # A6394 fron Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to Dr Yoshio Takane. A portion of this paper was presented at the biennial meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Toronto, 1985. I wish to thank Drs John Macnamara, Thomas Shultz, Andrew Baker, Gloria Water, Susanne McKenzie and Yoshio Takane for their advice and comments; Miss Farla Klaiman for her assistance in transcribing the audiotapes of the children's speech. I also wish to thank Drs Morton Mendelson, Jeffery Derevensky, the directors of McGill Family and Community Center and the YMCA for recruiting the subjects; and finally the parents and children for their cooperation in this research.

References

Charney, R. (1980). Speech roles and the development of personal pronouns. Journal of Child Language 7. 509–28.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chiat, S. (1981). Context-specificity and generalization in the acquisition of pronominal distinctions. Journal of Child Language 8. 7591.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chiat, S. (1982). If I were you and you were me: the analysis of pronouns in a pronoun-reversing child. Journal of Child Language 9. 359–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clark, E. V. (1978). From gesture to word: on the natural history of deixis in language acquisition. In Bruner, J. S. and Garton, A. (eds), Human Growth and Development. London: O.U.P.Google Scholar
de Paulo, B. M. & Bonvillian, J. D. (1978). The effect on language development of the special characteristics of speech addressed to children. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research 7. 189211.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leopold, W. (1949). Speech development of the bilingual child. Vol. 3. Grammar and general problems in the first two years. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.Google Scholar
Macnamara, J. (1982). Names for things. Cambridge MA: M.I.T. Press.Google Scholar
Maratsos, M. (1983). Some current issues in the study of the acquisition of grammar. In Mussen, P. (ed.), Handbook of child psychology. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
Nelson, K. (1973). Structure and strategy to learn to talk. Monographs of the society for Research in Child Development 38. 1137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oshima-Takane, Y. (1985 a). The learning of pronouns. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, McGill University.Google Scholar
Oshima-Takane, Y. (1985 b). Pronoun reversals in a normally developing child. Paper presented at the Tenth Annual Boston Conference on Language Development, Boston.Google Scholar
SchifT-Myers, N. (1983). From pronoun reversals to correct pronoun usage: A case study of a normally developing child. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders 48. 385–94.Google Scholar
Shipley, E. F. & Shipley, T. E. (1969). Quaker children's use of Thee: A relational analysis. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behaviour 8. 112–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Strayer, J. (1977). The development of personal reference in the language of two-year-olds. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Simon Fraser University.Google Scholar
Tanz, C. (1980). Studies in the acquisition of deictic terms. Cambridge: C.U.P.Google Scholar
62
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Children learn from speech not addressed to them: the case of personal pronouns*
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Children learn from speech not addressed to them: the case of personal pronouns*
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Children learn from speech not addressed to them: the case of personal pronouns*
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *