Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-5zgkz Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2021-09-19T05:44:26.160Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

USING INDIRECT METHODS TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF FORCED MIGRATION ON LONG-TERM UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 November 2004

KAVITA SINGH
Affiliation:
MEASURE Evaluation, UNC-Chapel Hill, USA
UNNI KARUNAKARA
Affiliation:
Medecins Sans Frontieres, Amsterdam, Holland
GILBERT BURNHAM
Affiliation:
Bloomberg School of Public Health Johns Hopkins University, USA
KENNETH HILL
Affiliation:
Bloomberg School of Public Health Johns Hopkins University, USA

Abstract

Despite the large numbers of displaced persons and the often-lengthy periods of displacement, little is known about the impact of forced migration on long-term under-five mortality. This paper looks at the Brass Method (and adaptations of this method) and the Preceding Birth Technique in combination with a classification of women by their migration and reproductive histories, in order to study the impact of forced migration on under-five mortality. Data came from the Demography of Forced Migration Project, a study on mortality, fertility and violence in the refugee and host populations of Arua District, Uganda and Yei River District, Sudan. Results indicate that women who did not migrate in a situation of conflict and women who repatriated before the age of 15, had children with the highest under-five mortality rates compared with women who were currently refugees and women who repatriated after the age of 15.

Type
Regular Articles
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
5
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

USING INDIRECT METHODS TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF FORCED MIGRATION ON LONG-TERM UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

USING INDIRECT METHODS TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF FORCED MIGRATION ON LONG-TERM UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

USING INDIRECT METHODS TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT OF FORCED MIGRATION ON LONG-TERM UNDER-FIVE MORTALITY
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *