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The one-child family: international patterns and their implications for the People's Republic of China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Dudley L. Poston
Affiliation:
Population Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, USA
Mei-Yu Yu
Affiliation:
Population Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, USA

Summary

The campaign for one-child families in the People's Republic of China has created world-wide interest. This study compares the general rates of single-child families in China and in 60 other countries and shows that China's current rate (12.5) is relatively low in comparison with some developed countries, e.g. Hungary (25.0). The mean age-specific single-child rate for 54 less developed countries shows a different pattern from that for seven developed countries; this is likely to be due to the later age of marriage and longer birth intervals of women in the developed countries.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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References

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