Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-qdp55 Total loading time: 0.235 Render date: 2021-11-29T03:54:40.769Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Continuing fertility transitions in a plural society: ethnic trends and differentials in Peninsular Malaysia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2008

Lin Lean Lim
Affiliation:
Department of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra.
Gavin W. Jones
Affiliation:
Department of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra.
Charles Hirschman
Affiliation:
Department of Demography, Australian National University, Canberra.

Summary

Fertility in Peninsular Malaysia has declined continuously from the late 1950s, reaching a TFR of 3735 in 1983. All ethnic groups in Malaysia have contributed to this modern demographic transition but the rate of change has been most rapid for Chinese and Indians, Malay fertility having reached a plateau in the early 1980s. The effect of age structure, marital patterns and marital fertility (by parity) on the fertility declines for each ethnic community are analysed. Continuation of current trends would lead to replacement-level fertility for Malaysian Chinese and Indians by the year 2000. Malay fertility is likely to continue to decline but at a more moderate pace.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Chander, R., Palan, V. T., Aziz, N. L. & Tan, B. A. (1977) Malaysia Fertility and Family Survey 1974, p. 162. Department of Statistics and National Family Planning Board, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
Cho, L. J., Palmore, J. & Saunders, L. (1968) Recent fertility trends in West Malaysia. Demography, 5, 732.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coale, A. J. & Tye, C. Y. (1961) The significance of age patterns of fertility in high fertility populations. Milbank meml Fund Q. Bull. 39, 631.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
DaVanzo, J. & Haaga, J. (1982) Anatomy of a fertility decline: Peninsular Malaysia, 1950–1976. Popul. Stud. 36, 373.Google Scholar
Freedman, R. (1979) Theories of fertility decline: a reappraisal. Social Forces, 58, 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirschman, C. (1974) Estimates of the Intercensal Population, 1957–1970, by Sex, Community and Age Group: Peninsular Malaysia. Research Paper No. 9. Department of Statistics, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
Hirschman, C. (1979) Political independence and educational opportunity in Peninsular Malaysia. Sociol. Educ. 52, 67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirschman, C. (1980) Demographic trends in Peninsular Malaysia, 1947–75. Popul. Dev. Rev. 6, 117.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hirschman, C. (1986) The recent rise in Malay fertility: a new trend or a temporary lull in a fertility transition? Demography, 23, 161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hirschman, C. & Fernandez, D. (1980) The decline of fertility in Peninsular Malaysia. Genus, 36. 93.Google ScholarPubMed
Jones, G. W. (1980) Trends in marriage and divorce in Peninsular Malaysia. Popul. Stud. 34, 279.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jones, G. W. (1981) Malay marriage and divorce in Peninsular Malaysia: three decades of change. Popul. Dev. Rev. 7,261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, G. (1984) Demographic Transition in Asia, Chap. 1. Maruzen, Singapore.Google Scholar
Jones, G. W. & Lim, L. L. (1985) Scenarios for future population growth in Malaysia. Kajian Malaysia, 3, 1.Google Scholar
Jones, G. W. & Tan, P. C. (1985) Recent and prospective population trends in Malaysia. J. S. E. Asian Stud. 16, 262.Google ScholarPubMed
Knodel, J. (1977) Age patterns of fertility and the fertility transition: evidence from Europe and Asia. Popul. Stud. 31, 219.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kusnic, M. M. & DaVanzo, J. (1982) Who are the poor in Malaysia? The sensitivity of poverty profiles to definition of income. Popul. Dev. Rev. 8 (Suppl.), 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, K. H. (1982) Age at first marriage in Malaysia. J. Marr. & Fam. 44, 785.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malaysia Department of Statistics (1983a) 1980 Population and Housing Census of Malaysia: General Report of the Population Census, Vol. 2. Department of Statistics, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
Malaysia Department of Statistics (1983b) Vital Statistics Peninsular Malaysia, 1982, p. 508. Department of Statistics, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
National Family Planning Board (1984) Survey on Health and Family Planning in Johore and Perak, Malaysia, Studies on Health and Family Planning in ASEAN Countries. NFPB, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
Palmore, J., Chander, R. & Fernandez, D. (1975) The demographic situation in Malaysia. In: Population and Development in Southeast Asia. Edited by Kanter, J. & McCaffrey, L., Heath, Lexington.Google Scholar
Palmore, J. A. & Marzuki, A. B. (1969) Marriage patterns and cumulative fertility in West Malaysia, 1966–67. Demography, 6, 394.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rahman, A. A. (1983) Family Size Preference and Use of Contraception in Peninsular Malaysia. MA thesis, Australian National University, Canberra.Google Scholar
Retherford, R. & Cho, L. J. (1974) Comparative analysis of recent fertility trends in East Asia. In: International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, International Population Conference, Liège, Vol. 2, p. 163. IUSSP,Liège.Google Scholar
Sandhu, K. S. (1964) Emergency resettlement in Malaya. J. trop. Geogr. 18, 157.Google Scholar
Saw, S. H. (1964) A note on the under-registration of births in Malaya during the intercensal period 1947–1957. Popul. Stud. 18, 35.Google Scholar
Saw, S. H. (1967a) Fertility differentials in early postwar Malaya. Demography, 4, 641.Google Scholar
Saw, S. H. (1967b) A note on the fertility levels in Malaya during 1947–1957. Malayan econ. Rev. 12, 117.Google Scholar
Sidhu, M. S. & Jones, G. W. (1981) Population Dynamics in a Plural Society: Peninsular Malaysia, Chap. 11. University of Malaya Co-operative Bookshop, Kuala Lumpur.Google Scholar
Smith, T. E. (1952) Population Growth in Malaya: an Analysis of Recent Trends. Oxford University Press, London.Google Scholar
6
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Continuing fertility transitions in a plural society: ethnic trends and differentials in Peninsular Malaysia
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Continuing fertility transitions in a plural society: ethnic trends and differentials in Peninsular Malaysia
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Continuing fertility transitions in a plural society: ethnic trends and differentials in Peninsular Malaysia
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *