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The second-order analysis of stationary point processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2016

B. D. Ripley
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Abstract

This paper provides a rigorous foundation for the second-order analysis of stationary point processes on general spaces. It illuminates the results of Bartlett on spatial point processes, and covers the point processes of stochastic geometry, including the line and hyperplane processes of Davidson and Krickeberg. The main tool is the decomposition of moment measures pioneered by Krickeberg and Vere-Jones. Finally some practical aspects of the analysis of point processes are discussed.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Applied Probability Trust 1976 

References

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