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Server advantage in tennis matches

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2016

I. M. MacPhee
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Jonathan Rougier
Affiliation:
University of Durham
G. H. Pollard
Affiliation:
University of Canberra
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

We show that the advantage that can accrue to the server in tennis does not necessarily imply that serving first changes the probability of winning the match. We demonstrate that the outcome of tie-breaks, sets and matches can be independent of who serves first. These are corollaries of a more general invariance result that we prove for n-point win-by-2 games. Our proofs are non-algebraic and self-contained.

Type
Short Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Applied Probability Trust 2004 

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References

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