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Self-exciting multifractional processes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2021

Salvador Ortiz-Latorre*
Affiliation:
University of Oslo
*Corresponding
*Postal address: Postboks 1053 Blindern, 0316 OSLO.

Abstract

We propose a new multifractional stochastic process which allows for self-exciting behavior, similar to what can be seen for example in earthquakes and other self-organizing phenomena. The process can be seen as an extension of a multifractional Brownian motion, where the Hurst function is dependent on the past of the process. We define this by means of a stochastic Volterra equation, and we prove existence and uniqueness of this equation, as well as giving bounds on the p-order moments, for all $p\geq1$. We show convergence of an Euler–Maruyama scheme for the process, and also give the rate of convergence, which is dependent on the self-exciting dynamics of the process. Moreover, we discuss various applications of this process, and give examples of different functions to model self-exciting behavior.

Type
Research Papers
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Applied Probability Trust

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