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Series on Church and State Church and State in the Legal Tradition of Australia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2009

Abstract

The relationship between church and state in Australia has been examined on many occasions, though principally by historians and theologians. This article examines how the legislature and courts of Australia have handled problems where there has been a conflict at the interface between secular and religious interests. The article deals with constitutional issues, conflict in education, in town planning and taxation as well as considering what we really mean by ‘church’ and ‘state’ in this context and how problems might manifest themselves in the twenty-first century.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © SAGE Publications (Los Angeles, London, New Delhi and Singapore) and The Journal of Anglican Studies Trust 2003

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References

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Series on Church and State Church and State in the Legal Tradition of Australia
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