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Variation in tannin content in Vicia faba L.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

A. Cabrera
Affiliation:
Departamento de Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, Apartado 3048, 14080 Córdoba, Spain
A. Martin
Affiliation:
Departamento de Genética, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, Apartado 3048, 14080 Córdoba, Spain

Summary

The tannin content of milled seed of 55 lines of Vicia faba was evaluated and related to flower and testa colour, seed weight and percentage of testa. Tannin content in the lines analysed was related more to flower colour than to testa colour. No relationship existed between tannin content and seed weight. Lines with low tannin content had a low proportion of testa.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1986

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References

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