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Termination of flowering in ‘indeterminate’ faba beans (Vicia faba)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

F. L. Stoddard
Affiliation:
Department of Plant Science, University of Adelaide, Waite Agricultural Research Institute, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia

Summary

The duration of flowering was investigated in 14 accessions of indeterminate faba (field) beans (Vicia faba L.) planted near Adelaide, South Australia in 1986 and 1987. All flowers and young pods were removed from plants at 4–7 day intervals. Plants of ‘Mediterranean’ origin produced 20–30 flowering nodes while those of European ‘spring bean’ type produced up to 50. Terminal inflorescences were eventually produced in all accessions. In control plants, the number of days between anthesis at successive nodes was partly dependent on nocturnal minimum temperature and varied very little between genotypes. It should be possible to make best use of the growing season by optimizing the potential production of nodes, but there is little opportunity for manipulating the rate of their appearance.

Type
Crops and Soils
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1993

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