Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-6tv95 Total loading time: 0.211 Render date: 2021-05-14T05:18:14.295Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Rumen fill, forage palatability and alimentary behaviour in sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

R. Baumont
Affiliation:
Unité de l'Ingestion, Station de Recherches sur la Nutrition des Herbivores, INRA-CRZV de Theix, 63122 Ceyrat, France
N. Seguier
Affiliation:
Unité de l'Ingestion, Station de Recherches sur la Nutrition des Herbivores, INRA-CRZV de Theix, 63122 Ceyrat, France
J. P. Dulphy
Affiliation:
Unité de l'Ingestion, Station de Recherches sur la Nutrition des Herbivores, INRA-CRZV de Theix, 63122 Ceyrat, France

Summary

Five sheep were fitted with rumen cannulas and fed once daily ad libitumat 09.00 h with a low-quality mixed-grass hay or a good-quality lucerne hay. The effects of a second amount of the same hay or of the second hay distributed at the end of the large meal following the morning distribution, when rumen fill reaches its daily maximum, were investigated for feed intake, alimentary behaviour and rumen fill. The second distribution induced a true meal (200–400 g dry matter intake), except in the case of mixed grass offered after lucerne. On the basis of initial eating rate and the amount ingested, the highest palatability was for lucerne offered after mixed grass, and the lowest for mixed grass offered after lucerne. Diet selection was more pronounced with lucerne than with mixed grass, as indicated by the larger decrease in the neutral detergent fibre content of the fraction ingested. The true meals following the second distribution were associated with an increase in rumen fill up to 10% of the daily maximum observed without the second distribution. However, rumen fill with lucerne remained 1 kg lower than with mixed-grass hay, even after a second meal. It is concluded that the sensory response induced by a distribution of a sufficiently palatable hay is able to override the satiety signals due to rumen fill, and that there is a permanent balance between the stimuli related to the characteristics of the food available and those related to reticulo-ruminal digesta.

Type
Animals
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Aitchison, E. M. (1985). A study of the removal of fibre from the rumen and voluntary intake of sheep eating hay diets. PhD thesis, University of Reading.Google Scholar
Aitchison, E. M., Gill, M., Dhanoa, M. S. & Osbourn, D. F. (1986). The effect of digestibility and forage species on the removal of digesta from the rumen and the voluntary intake of hay by sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 56, 463476.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Arnold, G. W. (1966). The special senses in grazing animals. II. Smell, taste and touch and dietary habits in sheep. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 17, 531542.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Aufrere, J. (1982). Study of the prediction of forage digestibility by an enzymatic method. Annales de Zootechnie 31, 111130 [in French].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baile, C. A. & Forbes, J. M. (1974). Control of feed intake and regulation of energy balance in ruminants. Physiological Reviews 50, 160214.Google Scholar
Baumont, R., Brun, J. P. & Dulphy, J. P. (1989). Influence of the nature of hay on its ingestibility and the kinetics of intake during large meals in sheep and cows. In XVIth International Grassland Congress, Nice, France (Ed. Jarrige, R.), pp. 787788. Versailles: French Grassland Society.Google Scholar
Baumont, R., Dulphy, J. P. & Andrieu, J. P. (1988). Feeding behaviour and reticulo-ruminal fill in sheep fed ad libitum grass hay or lucerne hay with continuous or restricted access: effects on physical control of feed intake. Reproduction Nutrition Développement 28, 573588 [in French].CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baumont, R., Malbert, C. H. & Ruckebusch, Y. (1990). Mechanical stimulation of rumen fill and alimentary behaviour in sheep. Animal Production 50, 123128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brun, J. P., Prache, S. & Bechet, G. (1984). A portable device for eating behaviour studies. 5th Meeting of European Grazing Workshop (Eds Armstrong, R. & Doney, J.). Midlothian: Hill Farming Research Organisation.Google Scholar
Campling, R. C. (1970). Physical regulation of voluntary intake. In Physiology of Digestion and Metabolism in Ruminants (Ed. Phillipson, A. T.), pp. 226234. Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Oriel Press.Google Scholar
Church, D. C. (1979). Taste, appetite and regulation of energy balance and control of food intake. Part I. In Digestive Physiology and Nutrition in Ruminants, 2nd Edn (Ed. Church, D. C.), pp. 291320. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Dulphy, J. P. (1971). Influence of the live weight and of the level of intake on eating and ruminating behaviour in sheep. Annales de Zootechnie 20, 477486 [in French].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dulphy, J. P., Remond, B. & Theriez, M. (1980). Ingestive behaviour and related activities in ruminants. In Digestive Physiology and Metabolism in Ruminants (Eds Ruckebusch, Y. & Thivend, P.), pp 103122. Lancaster: MTP.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dulphy, J. P., El Meddah, Y. & Baumont, R. (1988). Ingestive activities and diurnal rumen content variations in sheep as affected by feeding frequency. Reproduction Nutrition Développement 28, 919929 [in French].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Forbes, J. M., Wright, J. A. & Bannister, A. (1972). A note on rate of eating in sheep. Animal Production 15, 211214.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freer, M. & Campling, R. C. (1965). Factors affecting the voluntary intake of food by cows. 7. The behaviour and reticular motility of cows given diets of hay, dried grass, concentrates and ground pelleted hay. British Journal of Nutrition 19, 195207.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gallouin, F. & le Magnen, J. (1987). Historical evolution of the concepts of hunger, satiety and appetite. Reproduction Nutrition Développement 27, 109128 [in French].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gatel, F. (1984). Signification of initial satiety in sheep: effects of hay quality and cues associated with feeding. Annales de Zootechnie 33, 111118 [in French].CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goering, H. K. & van Soest, P. J. (1970). In Forage Fiber Analyses. Agricultural Handbook No. 379. Washington D.C.: US Department of Agriculture.Google Scholar
Greenhalgh, J. F. D. & Reid, G. W. (1967). Separating the effects of digestibility and palatability on food intake in ruminant animals. Nature 214, 744.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Greenhalgh, J. F. D. & Reid, G. W. (1971). Relative palatability to sheep of straw, hay and dried grass. British Journal of Nutrition 26, 107116.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grenet, E. (1989). A comparison of the digestion and reduction in particle size of lucerne hay (Medicago saliva) and Italian ryegrass hay (Lolium italicum) in the ovine digestive tract. British Journal of Nutrition 62, 493507.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grovum, W. L. (1979). Factors affecting the voluntary intake of food by sheep. 2. The role of distension and tactile input from compartments of the stomach. British Journal of Nutrition 42, 425436.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hidari, H. (1979). Estimation of the rumen load of sheep through measuring the consistency of rumen contents. Japanese Journal of Zootechnical Science 50, 402410.Google Scholar
Kenney, P. A. & Black, J. L. (1984). Factors affecting diet selection by sheep. I. Potential eating rate and acceptability of feed. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 35, 551563.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenney, P. A., Black, J. L. & Colebrook, W. F. (1984). Factors affecting diet selection by sheep. III. Dry matter content and particle length of forage. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 35, 831838.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malbert, C. H. & Baumont, R. (1989). The effects of intake of lucerne (Medicago saliva L.) and orchard grass (Dactylis glomerata L.) hay on the motility of the forestomach and digesta flow at the abomaso-duodenal junction of the sheep. British Journal of Nutrition 61, 699714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moseley, G. & Antuna Manendez, A. (1989). Factors affecting the eating rate of forage feeds. In XVIth International Grassland Congress, Nice, France (Ed. Jarrige, R.), pp. 789790. Versailles: French Grassland Society.Google Scholar
Reid, C. S. W. (1986). Digestive physiology: the challenges today and tomorrow. In Control of Digestion and Metabolism in Ruminants (Eds Milligan, L. P., Grovum, W. L. & Dobson, A.), pp. 540557. New Jersey, USA: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
Ruckebusch, Y. (1963). Research on the central control of alimentary behaviour in sheep. Thesis, Universite de Lyon [in French].Google Scholar
Statistical Analysis System Institute (1985). Statistical Guide for Personal Computers, Version 6. Cary, North Carolina: Statistical Analysis System Institute Inc.Google Scholar
Thompson, B. C., Cruickshank, G. J., Poppi, D. P. & Sykes, A. R. (1985). Diurnal patterns of rumen fill in grazing sheep. Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Animal Production 45, 117120.Google Scholar
Welch, J. G. (1967). Appetite control in sheep by indigestible fibres. Journal of Animal Science 26, 849854.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Rumen fill, forage palatability and alimentary behaviour in sheep
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Rumen fill, forage palatability and alimentary behaviour in sheep
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Rumen fill, forage palatability and alimentary behaviour in sheep
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *