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The relation between the vapour pressure and water content of soils

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

Amar Nath Puri
Affiliation:
Soil Physics Department, Rothamsted Experimental Station.
Edward M. Crowther
Affiliation:
Soil Physics Department, Rothamsted Experimental Station.
Bernard A. Keen
Affiliation:
Soil Physics Department, Rothamsted Experimental Station.

Extract

Much of the modern work on the physical properties of soil has been interpreted on a colloidal basis and more recently this hypothesis has been extended by the thermodynamical studies of Wilsdon and also by the investigations of two of us on an indirect measurement of the vapour pressure of capillary systems. There is evidence that the colloidal portion of the soil can be regarded as possessing a reticulate structure, possibly analogous to that shown by Zsigmondy to exist in silica gels. The pore space in soils is therefore an assemblage of voids and irregular capillaries ranging from ultramicroscopic dimensions in the colloidal portions to the macroscopic interstices between adjacent compound particles and the larger mineral fragments. Whereas in studies of evaporation and movement of water the total intersticial space is operative, the vapour pressure of soils at different moisture contents is very largely controlled by the minute pores associated with the colloidal portion and the larger voids have comparatively little influence. Vapour pressure measurements therefore afford a promising line of attack on the physical relations between the colloidal soil material and water, especially when the measurements are made on soils subjected to a variety of preliminary treatments, known to have a considerable effect on other physical properties. The effect of successive wetting and drying, heating and addition of salts are of especial interest in this connection.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1925

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References

page 68 note 1 E.g. Keen, B. A., Journ. Agric. Sci. 6 (1914), 456; 10 (1920), 44.CrossRefGoogle ScholarComber, N. M., Journ. Agric Sci. 10 (1920), 425; 11 (1921), 450; 12 (1922), 372.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 68 note 2 Wilsdon, B. H., Mem. Indian Agric. Dept, Chem. Series, 6 (1921), 155;Google ScholarJourn. Agric. Sci. 14 (1924), 473.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 68 note 3 Crowther, E. M. and A. N., Puri, Proc. Roy. Soc. 106 A (1924), 232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 69 note 1 Thomas, M. D., Soil Science, 11 (1921), 409434.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 69 note 2 Soil Science., 17 (1924), 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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page 76 note 1 Loc. cit.Google Scholar

page 77 note 1 Shorter, S. A., Journ. Textile Inst. 15 (1924), T. 328336.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 77 note 2 Schloesing, Bull. Soc. Encour. Indust. Nat. 1893.

page 80 note 1 Anderson, J. S., Z. physik. Chem. 88 (1914), 191.Google Scholar

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page 86 note 1 Thomas, M. D., Soil Science, 18 (1924), 118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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