Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-bkjnw Total loading time: 1.026 Render date: 2021-10-22T01:30:01.370Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Fat deposition in Hereford and Friesian steers: 2. Cellular development of the major fat depots

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

T. G. Truscott
Affiliation:
Animal Physiology Division, A.R.C. Meat Research Institute, Langford, Bristol, BS18 7DY
J. D. Wood
Affiliation:
Animal Physiology Division, A.R.C. Meat Research Institute, Langford, Bristol, BS18 7DY
H. R. Denny
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Surgery, University of Bristol, Langford, Bristol, BS18 7DY

Summary

The size and number of recognizable fat cells (diameters greater than 5 μm) were examined at several sites in 42 Hereford and Friesian steers. Four, two and 15 animals from each breed were slaughtered at 6, 13 and 20 months of age, respectively, after ad libitum feeding.

For the 15 animals of each breed slaughtered at 20 months, biopsy samples of adipose tissue were removed at 10, 13 and 17 months from the 12th rib, midloin, rump and perirenal sites. Samples from these sites and from the brisket (subcutaneous), prescapular (intermuscular) and omental sites were also removed from the carcasses of slaughtered animals. Fat cell diameter (microscopic technique) and dry matter (from which lipid content was predicted) were measured on all samples. Measurement of fat depth (ultrasound) and surface area at the subcutaneous sites allowed changes in relative number of cells to be estimated during growth.

From biopsied samples it was apparent that the perirenal depot grew almost exclusively through cell enlargement in both breeds. In contrast, the subcutaneous depot grew principally through cell enlargement to about 13 months of age and thereafter through both increase in number of cells and cell enlargement. The trigger for this increase in number of cells was possibly a critical average cell size, although this clearly did not operate in perirenal fat.

Slaughter samples showed that cellularity changes with growth were similar in the perirenal and omental depots (intra-abdominal) whereas changes in the prescapular (intermuscular) site tended to parallel those in the subcutaneous depot.

In relation to fat-free body weight (and therefore taking body size into account) both breeds had similar numbers of intra-abdominal and prescapular fat cells, but the Herefords had approximately double the number of subcutaneous fat cells compared with the Friesians.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Allen, C. E. (1976). Cellularity of adipose tissue in meat animals. Federation Proceedings 35, 23032307.Google ScholarPubMed
Burleigh, I. G. (1974). On the cellular regulation of growth and development in skeletal muscle. Biological Reviews 49, 267320.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Faust, I., Johnson, P. R. & Hirsch, J. (1977). Surgical removal of adipose tissue alters feeding behaviour and the development of obesity in rats. Science, N. Y. 197, 393396.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kirtland, J. & Gurr, M. I. (1979). Adipose tissue cellularity: a review. 2. The relationship between cellularity and obesity. International Journal of Obesity 3, 1555.Google ScholarPubMed
Klyde, B. J. & Hirsch, J. (1979). Increased cellular proliferation in adipose tissue of adult rats fed a high-fat diet. Journal of Lipid Research 20, 706715.Google ScholarPubMed
Moran, J. B. (1976). Beef production as influenced by grazing and feeding management and by mature size. Ph.D. thesis, University of London.Google Scholar
Robelin, J. (1981). Cellularity of bovine adipose tissues: development changes from 15 to 65 per cent mature weight. Journal of Lipid Research 22, 452457.Google Scholar
Truscott, T. G., Wood, J. D. & MacFie, H. J. H. (1983). Fat deposition in Hereford and Friesian steers. 1. Body composition and partitioning of fat between depots. Journal of Agricultural Science, Cambridge 100, 257270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tulloh, H. M., Truscott, T. G. & Lang, C. P. (1973). An evaluation of the ‘Scanogram’ for predicting the carcass composition of cattle. Melbourne, Australia: University of Melbourne (mimeograph).Google Scholar
21
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Fat deposition in Hereford and Friesian steers: 2. Cellular development of the major fat depots
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Fat deposition in Hereford and Friesian steers: 2. Cellular development of the major fat depots
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Fat deposition in Hereford and Friesian steers: 2. Cellular development of the major fat depots
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *