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The effects of the genotype by environmental interaction on the fixation of heterosis in tomato

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 October 2002

P. A. CHRISTAKIS
Affiliation:
National Agricultural Research Foundation (NAGREF), Vine and Vegetable Institute, Gastouni, Greece, GR-273 00
A. C. FASOULAS
Affiliation:
Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Thessaloniki, Greece, GR-540 06

Abstract

Continuous honeycomb selection and testing in the absence of competition in a single environment, resulted in the isolation of recombinant inbreds in tomato that outperformed the hybrid only in that particular environment. Alternating selection and testing in two environments (open field v. glasshouse) reduced selection efficiency, by preventing exploitation of the whole constellation of genes contributing to heterosis. Selection in the F2 generation was most critical, as evidenced by the appearance of recombinant lines outperforming the hybrid as early as in the F3 generation. Exploitable genetic variation existed in advanced generations and even after the point of achieving theoretical homozygosity (F7 generation). In the future, and in order to fully exploit the unique possibilities offered by the honeycomb methodology (control of soil heterogeneity, high selection pressures, crop yield components), selection for reduced GE interaction should be practiced simultaneously over the target environments of adaptation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press

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