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The effect of three different growth rates on some offal components of cattle

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

D. M. Murray
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture and Forestry, University of MelbourneParkville, 3052, Australia.
N. M. Tulloh
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture and Forestry, University of MelbourneParkville, 3052, Australia.
W. H. Winter
Affiliation:
School of Agriculture and Forestry, University of MelbourneParkville, 3052, Australia.

Summary

This paper describes the effect of three different growth rates on some offal components of Angus cattle. The growth rates were: high (H, 0·8 kg/day), low (L, 0·4 kg/day) and high-maintenance (HM, 0·8 kg/day followed by a period during which body weight was held constant).

Equations are presented which enable the weights of the offal components to be calculated within the body weight range 300–440 kg.

For most tissues, weights in the H group were greater than in the L and HM groups and included: liver, rumen-reticulum, small intestine and the total alimentary tract. Weight of fat trimmed from the rumen-reticulum, omasum, large intestine and total alimentary tract was also greater in the H than in the L and HM groups. The reverse situation held for head, feet and tail and the spleen.

In spite of these differences between groups in weights and composition of offals, the carcass composition in all groups was similar (Murray, Tulloh & Winter, 1974). It appears that, at a given body weight, changes in the offals may buffer the carcass against change in composition when cattle are exposed to different growth patterns.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1977

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References

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