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Effect of dietary reduction and sex class on nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance, excreted purine derivatives and infrared thermography of hair lambs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2018

E. S. Pereira
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
A. C. N. Campos
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
E. L. Heinzen
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
J. A. D. Barbosa Filho
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
M. S. S. Carneiro
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
D. R. Fernandes
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Ceara, Ceará – 60021970, Brazil
L. R. Bezerra
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Campina Grande, Paraíba − 58429900, Brazil
R. L. Oliveira*
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Bahia, Bahia – 41170110, Brazil
*Corresponding
Author for correspondence: R. L. Oliveira, E-mail: ronaldooliveira@ufba.br

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate whether dietary reduction and sex class affect nutrient intake, digestibility, purine derivative (PD) excretion and heat tolerance coefficient in lambs. Thirty-five hair lambs (14.5 ± 0.89 kg initial body weight (BW), 2 months old) were used in a completely randomized study with a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement, three sex classes (11 intact males, 12 castrated males and 12 females) and three levels of feeding (ad libitum, 300 and 600 g/kg/dry matter (DM) feed restriction) for 120 days. Intact and castrated males showed higher intakes of DM and neutral detergent fibre corrected for ash and protein (NDFap) than females. At 300 g/kg/DM feed restriction, NDFap digestibility was lower in intact males than in other classes; however, no differences were found between classes when subjected to ad libitum feeding or 600 g/kg/DM. The basal endogenous nitrogen and endogenous urinary losses were highest in intact males. Allantoin, uric acid and PD excretion, as well as PD absorption and microbial protein production were lowest in the animals subjected to 600 g/kg/DM feed restriction. Microbial protein synthesis (MPS) was highest in animals subjected to 600 g/kg/DM feed restriction. The lowest temperatures were observed in animals subjected to 600 g/kg/DM feed restriction. The heat tolerance coefficient was highest in animals subjected to 600 g/kg/DM feed restriction. In conclusion, feed restriction reduced the time spent on feeding and rumination but increased the digestibility of DM. The restriction level of 600 g/kg/DM maximized MPS and infrared thermography indicated an elevated heat tolerance coefficient.

Type
Animal Research Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

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Effect of dietary reduction and sex class on nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance, excreted purine derivatives and infrared thermography of hair lambs
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