Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-8rn5k Total loading time: 0.243 Render date: 2021-07-23T20:06:27.963Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Effect of anchor and core sequence in microsatellite primers on flax fingerprinting patterns

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 October 2001

I. WIESNER
Affiliation:
The Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Branišovská 31, České Budějovice, CZ 370 05, Czech Republic
D. WIESNEROVÁ
Affiliation:
The Institute of Plant Molecular Biology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Branišovská 31, České Budějovice, CZ 370 05, Czech Republic
E. TEJKLOVÁ
Affiliation:
AGRITEC Research, Breeding, Services Ltd., Zemědělská 16, šumperk, CZ 787 01, Czech Republic

Abstract

The aim of this study was to select the best arrangements of MP–PCR (microsatellite-primed PCR) for routine large-scale fingerprinting of flax cultivars. We found optimum PCR conditions for the application of five previously published primers (PCT1–PCT5) to flax cultivar fingerprinting. We modified to optimum MP–PCR which was targeted to flax tetrameric [GATA] microsatellite loci specified by primer PCT6. We found that after a reamplification PCR step was involved we were able to generate highly discriminating fingerprinting patterns, which distinguished all eight flax cultivars individually. In particular primers 3PCT1 and 3PCT2 were promising for future large-scale fingerprinting due to the production of most polymorphic bands. Increasing annealing temperature within a temperature profile helped to generate new polymorphisms within flax microsatellite patterns especially with primer 3PCT2. Using this primer we succeeded in generating new polymorphic bands after increasing annealing temperature from 55 °C to 60 °C, and to 65 °C. A cluster analysis of flax cultivars was performed based on microsatellite data. The core group of eight flax cultivars was clustered into two homogeneous subclusters. A lower level of cultivar clustering within subclusters was not detected.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2001 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.
18
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Effect of anchor and core sequence in microsatellite primers on flax fingerprinting patterns
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Effect of anchor and core sequence in microsatellite primers on flax fingerprinting patterns
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Effect of anchor and core sequence in microsatellite primers on flax fingerprinting patterns
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *