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An analysis of primordium initiation in Avalon winter wheat crops with different sowing dates and at nine sites in England and Scotland

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 March 2009

E. J. M. Kirby
Affiliation:
Plant Breeding Institute, Cambridge, CB2 2LQ
J. R. Porter
Affiliation:
Long Ashton Research Station, Long Ashton, Bristol, BS18 9AF
W. Day
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ
Jill S. Adam
Affiliation:
Long Ashton Research Station, Long Ashton, Bristol, BS18 9AF
Margaret Appleyard
Affiliation:
Plant Breeding Institute, Cambridge, CB2 2LQ
Sarah Ayling
Affiliation:
Agricultural and Food Research Council, Letcombe Laboratory, Wantage, Oxfordshire, OX12 9JT
C. K. Baker
Affiliation:
Department of Agriculture and Horticulture, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE 12 5RD
R. K. Belford
Affiliation:
Agricultural and Food Research Council, Letcombe Laboratory, Wantage, Oxfordshire, OX12 9JT
P. V. Biscoe
Affiliation:
Broom's Barn Experimental Station, Higham, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP2S 6NP
Anne Chapman
Affiliation:
Seale Hayne College of Agriculture, Newton Abbot, Devon
M. P. Fuller
Affiliation:
Seale Hayne College of Agriculture, Newton Abbot, Devon
Janice Hampson
Affiliation:
West of Scotland Agricultural College, Auchincruive, Ayr, KA6 5HW
R. K. M. Hay
Affiliation:
West of Scotland Agricultural College, Auchincruive, Ayr, KA6 5HW
S. Matthews
Affiliation:
North of Scotland College of Agriculture, Aberdeen, AB9 IUD
W. J. Thompson
Affiliation:
North of Scotland College of Agriculture, Aberdeen, AB9 IUD
V. B. Anne Willington
Affiliation:
Broom's Barn Experimental Station, Higham, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, IP2S 6NP
D. W. Wood
Affiliation:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Hertfordshire, AL5 2JQ

Summary

The initiation of leaf and spikelet primordia was studied at sites ranging in latitude from Newton Abbot (50·6°N) to Aberdeen (57·2°N) in crops sown in the middle of September, October and November 1983. The rate of primordium initiation tended to decrease from south to north but there were also marked differences between quite close sites.

The rate of leaf initiation increased with temperature but photoperiod had little effect; the rate of spikelet initiation was affected both by temperature and by photoperiod. There were differences in the total number of leaves initiated which were only partlyexplained by differences in vernalization.

Expressing leaf and spikelet initiation rates in terms of thermal and photo-thermal time respectively showed a constant rate of leaf initiation and a constant and more rapid rate of spikelet initiation.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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References

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