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Willingness to Pay for Information Programs about E-Commerce: Results from a Convenience Sample of Rural Louisiana Businesses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2015

Susan Watson
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
O. John Nwoha
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness at, the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR
Gary Kennedy
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Sciences at, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
Kenneth Rea
Affiliation:
Academic Affairs at, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
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Abstract

The probability of a business paying various amounts of money for an e-commerce presence ultimately depends on demographic features, experiences with e-commerce from a buyer's and seller's perspective, technological expertise, and knowledge of e-commerce opportunities and limitations. Estimating functions to assign probabilities associated with the willingness to pay for an e-commerce presence will assist in forecasting regional likelihood of certain profiles paying various monetary amounts for an e-commerce presence. In addition, if services are provided at no cost by a third party, value to a society will be maximized by selecting profiles with the highest willingness to pay.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2005

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