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Import Demand for Disaggregated Fresh Fruits in Japan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2015

Troy G. Schmitz
Affiliation:
Morrison School of Agribusiness and Resource Management, Arizona State University East, Mesa, AZ
James L. Seale Jr.
Affiliation:
Food and Resource Economics Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
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Abstract

Using annual Japanese fresh fruit import data from 1971 to 1997, this study analyzes the import patterns of Japan's seven most popular fresh fruits by implementing and testing a general differential demand system that nests four alternative import demand specifications. When tested against the general system using the five-good case (bananas, grapefruits, oranges, and lemons and aggregating pineapples, berries, and grapes), the analysis rejects the Almost Ideal Demand System and National Bureau of Research specifications but does not reject Rotterdam and Central Bureau of Statistics models. When estimated using the six-good case (bananas, grapefruits, oranges, lemons, and pineapples and aggregating berries and grapes), the analysis rejects all specifications except the Rotterdam model.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2002

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