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The Effect of Food-Away-from-Home and Food-at-Home Expenditures on Obesity Rates: A State-Level Analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 January 2015

Yongxia Cai
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Pedro A. Alviola IV
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr.
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
Ximing Wu
Affiliation:
Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX
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Abstract

Using state-level data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, we investigate the effects of household food-away-from-home and food-at-home expenditures on overweight rates, obesity rates, and combined rates. Our random effects model estimates suggest that food-away-from-home expenditures are positively related to obesity and combined rates, while food-at-home expenditures are negatively related to obesity and combined rates. However, the magnitudes of these effects, while statistically significant, are relatively small. Both food-at-home and food-away-from-home expenditures do not significantly influence overweight rates.

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Invited Paper Sessions
Copyright
Copyright © Southern Agricultural Economics Association 2008

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