Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5wlnc Total loading time: 0.642 Render date: 2021-08-04T13:45:43.069Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The relationship between maternal depression (antenatal and pre-school stage) and childhood behavioural problems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

Michael Fitzgerald
Affiliation:
Trinity CollegeDublin and Eastern Health Board, Child and Family Centre, Ballyfermot Road, Dublin 10, Ireland.
Claire Collins
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Mercer Street Lower, Dublin 2, Ireland.

Abstract

Objective: This study aims to determine if there is a relationship between antenatal depression and maternal depression in the following three to four years. Secondly, to establish if there is a relationship between maternal depression and behavioural problems with the pre-school child. Thirdly, to investigate if social parameters are correlated with maternal health and childhood behaviour.

Method: In a longitudinal study, a sample of women were screened for depression at the antenatal stage and followed up four years later. Mothers were screened for depressive illness on both occasions. Children's behaviour was assessed at four years. Social parameters were also measured at the pre-school stage.

Result: Depression at the antenatal stage was not found to be significantly related to depression at the pre-school stage. The existence of a behaviour problem was not significantly related to the depressive state of the mother antenatally, however a currently depressed mother is approximately six times more likely to have a child with behaviour problems than a mother who is not depressed. Social factors were also assessed and found to correlate with maternal depression.

Conclusion: In managing a child with behavioural problems the child psychiatrist should consider the mental state of the mother. The social world of the individual would appear to be important and should not be ignored when treating either a child with behavioural problems or an adult with depression.

Type
Original Papers
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1998

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Leader, H, Fitzgerald, M, Kinsella, A. Behaviourally deviant pre school children and distressed mothers. Ir J Medical Sci 1985; 154(3): 106–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Caplan, HL, Gogill, SR, Alexandra, H, Robson, KM, Katz, R, Kumar, R. Maternal depressions and the emotional development of the child. Br J Psychiatry 1989; 154: 818–22.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Watson, JP, Elliott, SA, Rugg, AJ, Brough, DI. Psychiatric disorder in pregnancy and the first postnatal year. Br J Psychiatry 1984; 144: 453–62.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.O'Hara, MW. Social support, life events, and depression during pregnancy and the puerperium. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1986; 43: 569–73.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Cox, JL, Connor, Y, Kendell, RE. Prospective study of psychiatric disorders of childbirth. Br J Psychiatry 1982; 140: 111–7.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.Kumar, R, Robson, K. Neurotic disturbance during pregnancy and the puerperium: preliminary report of a prospective survey of 119 primparae. In: Sandler, M, ed. Mental illness in pregnancy and the puerperium London: Oxford Medical Publications, 1978.Google Scholar
7.Wolkind, S, Zajicek, E, Pregnancy: A psychological and social study. London: Academic Press Inc. 1981; 195218.Google Scholar
8.Zuckerman, B, Amaro, H, Bauchner, H. Depressive symptoms during pregnancy: relationship to poor health behaviours. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1989; 160: 1107–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Goldberg, DP, Cooper, B, Eastwood, MR, Kedward, HB, Shepherd, M. A standardised psychiatric interview for use in community surveys. Br J Preventative and Social Medicine 1970; 24: 1823.Google Scholar
10.Richman, N, Graham, PJ. A behaviour screening questionnaire for use with three year old children. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 1971; 12: 544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Clare, AW, Cairns, VE. Design, development and use of standardised interview to assess social maladjustment and dysfunction in community studies. Psychol Med 1978; 8: 589604.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Fitzgerald, M, McDermott, M, Cloonan, P. A psychological study of Irish urban mothers antenatally, postnatally and children's behaviour. (1987) unpublished.Google Scholar
13.Fitzgerald, M, Shaw, E. The psychological situation of Irish urban mothers post-natally and children's health. Irish Families under Stress, Volume iii: Editor Fitzgerald, M. Dublin: Eastern Health Board Publication, 1991.Google Scholar
7
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The relationship between maternal depression (antenatal and pre-school stage) and childhood behavioural problems
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The relationship between maternal depression (antenatal and pre-school stage) and childhood behavioural problems
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The relationship between maternal depression (antenatal and pre-school stage) and childhood behavioural problems
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *