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Medication discrepancies at the GP/psychiatric hospital interface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 June 2014

John Hickey
Affiliation:
Cefn Coed Hospital, Swansea, SA2 OGH, Wales
Peter Donnelly
Affiliation:
Swansea Valley Community Mental Health Services, Gelligron Road, Pontardawe, Swansea SA8 4LU, Wales

Abstract

Objective: To quantify the perceived discrepancies between the medication that GPs believed their patients were taking and that which was recorded on admission to acute psychiatric wards.

Methods: A prospective survey of 107 consecutive admissions to a Swansea psychiatric hospital was carried out.

Results: In 62% of patients studied, there was at least one discrepancy each and in 33%, the discrepancies were considered potentially clinically significant.

Conclusions: The study showed a significant number of potentially serious discrepancies in medication at the GP-Hospital interface and highlighted the need for improved communication between GPs and their psychiatric colleagues. The possible reasons for the discrepancies and the implications for communication between primary and secondary care for psychiatric patients are explored.

Type
Audits
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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