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Refraining the Reformation*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2016

Raymond Gillespie*
Affiliation:
Department of History, National University of Ireland, Maynooth

Extract

The Reformation in Ireland has never lacked chroniclers, defenders and detractors. The reason for this is not hard to discern. The older literature that grappled with the processes of religious change in sixteenth and seventeenth-century Ireland was based on a number of well-recognised and widely agreed propositions. The first of these was that confessional and political positions were inextricably linked, and the fate of one served not only as a proxy for the other but as an explanation for the trajectory of change; thus, to explain the failure of the reform process to strike deep roots in sixteenth-century Ireland, one had only to invoke the failure of the Tudor conquest.

Type
Review Article
Copyright
Copyright © Irish Historical Studies Publications Ltd 2009

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Footnotes

*

James Ussher: theology, history and politics in early modern Ireland and England. By Alan Ford. Pp 315. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2007. £64.

James Ussher and John Bramhall: the theology and politics of two Irish ecclesiastics of the seventeenth century. By Jack Cunningham. Pp 233. Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing. 2007.£55.

The reconstruction of the Church of Ireland: Bishop Bramhall and the Laudian reforms. By John McCafferty. Pp 268. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2007. £58.

References

1 For the older literature, see Ford, Alan, ‘“Standing one’s ground”: religion, polemic and Irish history since the Reformation’ in Ford, Alan, McGuire, James and Milne, Kenneth (eds), As by law established: the Church of Ireland since the Reformation (Dublin, 1995), pp 114.Google Scholar

2 For example, Edwards, David, ‘A haven of popery: English Catholic migration to Ireland in the age of plantations’ in Ford, Alan and McCafferty, John (eds), The origins of sectarianism in early modern Ireland (Cambridge, 2005), pp 95126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

3 In particular, Canny, Nicholas, ‘Why the Reformation failed in Ireland: une question mal posée’ in Journal of Ecclesiastical History, xxx (1970), pp 423-50.Google Scholar

4 Gillespie, Raymond, Devoted people: belief and religion in early modern Ireland (Manchester, 1997).Google Scholar

5 Idem, ‘Godly order: enforcing peace in the Irish Reformation’ in Elizabethanne Boran and Crawford Gribben (eds), Enforcing the Reformation in Ireland and Scotland, 1550- 1700 (Aldershot, 2006), pp 184–201.

6 T.C.D., MS 826, f. 299.

7 Kilroy, Phil, ‘Sermon and pamphlet literature in the Irish reformed Church, 1613–1634’ in Archivium Hibernicum, xxxiii (1975), pp 110-21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

8 Compare Gillespie, Raymond, ‘The crisis of reform, 1625–60’ in Milne, Kenneth (ed.), Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin: a history (Dublin, 2000), pp 195202Google Scholar with Gillespie, Raymond, ‘An age of modernization, 1598–1690’ in Crawford, John and Gillespie, Raymond (eds), St Patrick’s Cathedral, Dublin: a history (Dublin, 2009), pp 180-4.Google Scholar

9 Rogers, John, Ohel or Beth Shemesh (London, 1653), pp 393476.Google Scholar

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