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Invasion of the New Zealand Coastline by European Sea-Rocket (Cakile maritima) and American Sea-Rocket (Cakile edentula)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Roger D. Cousens*
Affiliation:
Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
Jane M. Cousens
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne Library, Southbank Campus, 234 St. Kilda Road, Southbank, Victoria 3006, Australia
*Corresponding
Corresponding author's E-mail: rcousens@unimelb.edu.au

Abstract

On the west coast of North America and in Australia, there have been parallel cases of sequential invasion and replacement of the shoreline plant American sea-rocket by European sea-rocket. A similar pattern has also occurred in New Zealand. For 30 to 40 yr, from its first recording in 1921, American sea-rocket spread throughout the eastern coastlines of the North and South Islands of New Zealand. European sea-rocket has so far been collected only on the North Island. From its first collection in 1937, European sea-rocket spread to the northern extremity of the island by 1973, and by 2010, it had reached the southernmost limit. In the region where both species have occurred in the past, American sea-rocket is now rarely found. This appears to be another example of congeneric species displacement.

Type
Notes and Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © Weed Science Society of America 

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Invasion of the New Zealand Coastline by European Sea-Rocket (Cakile maritima) and American Sea-Rocket (Cakile edentula)
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