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Living through war: Mental health of children and youth in conflict-affected areas

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 May 2020

Abstract

Children in armed conflict are frequently deprived of basic needs, psychologically supportive environments, educational and vocational opportunities, and other resources that promote positive psychosocial development and mental health. This article describes the mental health challenges faced by conflict-affected children and youth, the interventions designed to prevent or ameliorate the psychosocial impact of conflict-related experiences, and a case example of the challenges and opportunities related to addressing the mental health needs of Rohingya children and youth.

Type
The impact of armed conflict and other situations of violence on children
Copyright
Copyright © icrc 2020

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Ibid

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Ibid

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106 Ibid.

Ibid

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112 N. Islam, above note 70.

113 Ibid.

Ibid

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117 Food Security Sector, Support to Livelihoods of Host Communities and Resilience Opportunities for the Rohingya Refugees, Livelihood Working Group, Cox's Bazar, 2018, available at: https://fscluster.org/sites/default/files/documents/advocating_for_livelihoods_of_host_communities_and_resilience_opportunities_for_rohingya_refugees_0.pdf.

118 Michelle Azorbo, Microfinance and Refugees: Lessons Learned from UNHCR's Experience, Research Paper No. 199, Policy Development and Evaluation Service, UNHCR, Geneva, 2011.

119 Ainul, Sigma, Ehsan, Iqbal, Haque, Eashita, Amin, Sajeda, Rob, Ubaidur, Melnikas, Andrea J. and Falcone, Joseph, Marriage and Sexual and Reproductive Health of Rohingya Adolescents and Youth in Bangladesh: A Qualitative Study, Population Council, Dhaka, 2018Google Scholar.

120 Agenda for Humanity, “Supporting the Livelihoods of Refugees in Long-Term Displacement”, available at: www.agendaforhumanity.org/news-details/6640.

121 UNHCR and ILO, above note 116.

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