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REFUGEES AND CONFLICT SITUATIONS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 January 2010

Extract

The protection of refugees and displaced persons is guaranteed by many universal and regional instruments of international law. The rules are there, but for several years the humanitarian organizations charged with implementing them have constantly had to face new situations brought about by the scale and frequency of mass population movements, especially in the Third World, and new types of violence which affect both the status and the possibilities for protection of the people concerned. Very often, the solutions arrived at by these bodies have taken the form of assistance rather than protection, the one not always easily distinguishable from the other.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Committee of the Red Cross 1988

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References

1 See Jean-Luc Blondel, “Assistance to protected persons”, International Review of the Red Cross, No. 260, 0910 1987, pp. 451468.Google Scholar

2 Twenty-fourth International Conference of the Red Cross, Manila, 1981, Resolution XXI: “International Red Cross aid to refugees”.

3 “Opening message to the Second World Red Cross and Red Crescent Conference on Peace”, by Alexandre Hay, President of the ICRC, IRRC, No. 243, 1112 1984, p. 325.Google Scholar

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