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A subtest analysis of The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA): which subtests can best discriminate between healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2016

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Extract

The authors would like to apologise for a typographical error in the discussion of the above mentioned article.

In the discussion on page 830 of the article, paragraph ‘In the present sample, when we tested the accuracy of the MoCA to discriminate between MCI and healthy participants using ROC curves, the best cut-off score was 24 points, with good sensitivity and specificity ( 92% and 82%, respectively).’

Should read:

In the present sample, when we tested the accuracy of the MoCA to discriminate between MCI and healthy participants using ROC curves, the best cut-off score was 24 points, with good sensitivity and specificity (83% and 89%, respectively).

Type
Corrigendum
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2016 

The authors would like to apologise for a typographical error in the discussion of the above mentioned article.

In the discussion on page 830 of the article, paragraph ‘In the present sample, when we tested the accuracy of the MoCA to discriminate between MCI and healthy participants using ROC curves, the best cut-off score was 24 points, with good sensitivity and specificity ( 92% and 82%, respectively).’

Should read:

In the present sample, when we tested the accuracy of the MoCA to discriminate between MCI and healthy participants using ROC curves, the best cut-off score was 24 points, with good sensitivity and specificity (83% and 89%, respectively).

References

Cecato, J.F., Martinelli, J.E., Izbicki, R., Yassuda, M.S. and Aprahamian, I. (2016) ‘A subtest analysis of the Montreal cognitive assessment (MoCA): which subtests can best discriminate between healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease?’, International Psychogeriatrics, 28(5), pp. 825832. doi: 10.1017/S1041610215001982 CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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A subtest analysis of The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA): which subtests can best discriminate between healthy controls, mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease?
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