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FC2: The effect of Maintenance phase of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Alzheimer’s Dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 February 2024

Carol Sheei-Meei Wang
Affiliation:
Department of BioMedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan City, Taiwan
Kuo-Sheng Cheng
Affiliation:
Department of BioMedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City, Taiwan
Chia-Hung Tang
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Nien-Tsen Hou
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Pei-Fang Chien
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Ying-Che Huang
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Tainan Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Tainan City, Taiwan
Pai-Lien Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Biostatistics and Data Science, FHI 360, Durham, NC, USA
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Abstract

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Introduction:

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed to affect long-term synaptic plasticity through LTP and LTD, thereby improving cognitive ability. In pathology, the amyloid deposits in AD disrupts the balance between long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) of neuronal cells and synaptic plasticity. An increasing number of studies have been concluded a positive therapeutic effect on cognition in AD. In brain stimulation, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) was associated with improvements in memory enhancement, language, processing speed, global cognitive symptoms, and apathy over a period of treatment. Theoretically, the aftereffect of tDCS would need to be re-stimulated by tDCS to maintain its delayed plastic response benefits. In this pilot study, we investigate the maintenance effects of continuing tDCS at three different times, weekly, every two weeks, and every four weeks, for 12 weeks.

Method:

Twenty-eight AD participants aged 55-90 years were enrolled (mean age 72.7, 77.3, and 76.2 in the three groups - maintained weekly (7 cases), biweekly (9 cases) and every 4 weeks (12 cases)). The anodal electrode was placed over the left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex and the cathodal electrode was placed over the right supraorbital area. In each active session, we applied a current intensity of 2 mA and an electrode size of 25 cm2 for 30 min. All subjects received a series of neuropsychological assessments including CDR, MMSE, CASI and WCST at (1) baseline, (2) post-10sessions of tDCS (in 2weeks), and (3) post-maintenance phase (total of 12 weeks). Chi-square tests, Wilcoxon signed rank tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to assess differences in participant demographic characteristics and to compare differences in test scores between groups.

Results:

After 10 sessions of tDCS stimulations, the total CASI scores in the 1-week group improved significantly from baseline to 2 weeks. However, there are no significant difference in MMSE, CASI or WCST between baseline and after maintain phase stimulations in each group.

Conclusion:

Although tDCS has a positive effect in AD, it is recommended to prolong the number of tDCS stimulations, such as 20 sessions in 4 weeks.

Type
Free/Oral Communications
Copyright
© International Psychogeriatric Association 2024