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Validation of the Caregiver Guilt Questionnaire (CGQ) in a sample of British dementia caregivers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2013

Louise Roach*
Affiliation:
NHS Fife Department of Psychology, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline KY11 8JH, UK
Ken Laidlaw
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK
David Gillanders
Affiliation:
School of Health in Social Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh EH8 9AG, UK
Kathryn Quinn
Affiliation:
NHS Fife Department of Psychology, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline KY11 8JH, UK
*Corresponding
Correspondence should be addressed to: Louise Roach, NHS Fife Department of Psychology, Lynebank Hospital, Halbeath Road, Dunfermline, KY11 8JH, UK. Phone: +44 (0)1383 565402; Fax: +44 (0)1383 565409. Email: louise.roach@nhs.net.

Abstract

Background:

Depression is well documented as a key outcome variable for dementia caregivers; however, guilt has been under-researched, which may be in part due to the lack of an appropriate measure. The Caregiver Guilt Questionnaire (CGQ) was originally developed and piloted with a Spanish population but has not yet been tested in an English-speaking population.

Methods:

A cross-sectional postal survey was undertaken with a sample of 221 dementia caregivers in the UK, as part of a larger study of dementia caregiver outcome measures.

Results:

The five-factor structure identified for the CGQ in the Spanish sample was replicated in this study. The five factors, “guilt about doing wrong by the care recipient,” “guilt about failing to meet the challenges of caregiving,” ‘guilt over experience of negative emotions in relation to caregiving,” “guilt about self-care,” and “guilt about neglecting other relatives” accounted for 60% of the variance. Internal consistencies for the whole scale and factors were acceptable, and convergent validity was established with the Zarit Burden Interview guilt factor. A higher score on the CGQ was associated with a higher score on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) and a new cut-off score of 22 was established, which predicted a clinical score on the CES-D with 80.0% sensitivity and 61.5% specificity.

Conclusions:

The replication of the five-factor structure suggests that these are relevant themes within the feelings of guilt to both Hispanic and British dementia caregivers. The CGQ has been demonstrated to be a valid measure for use with British dementia caregivers and is likely to be of use in clinical and research settings.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2013 

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