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The usefulness of monitoring sleep talking for the diagnosis of dementia with Lewy bodies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2013

Kazuki Honda
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Mamoru Hashimoto
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Yusuke Yatabe
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Keiichiro Kaneda
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Seiji Yuki
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Yusuke Ogawa
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan Department of Health Promotion and Human Behavior, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
Shiho Matsuzaki
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Atsuko Tsuyuguchi
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Hibiki Tanaka
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Hiroko Kashiwagi
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Noriko Hasegawa
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan
Tomohisa Ishikawa
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Manabu Ikeda
Affiliation:
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background: Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common type of neurodegenerative dementia. It is frequently difficult to differentiate DLB from Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other types of dementia. This study examined the usefulness of monitoring sleep talking for the diagnosis of DLB.

Methods: A total of 317 patients with dementia were selected from a consecutive series at the Dementia Clinic of Kumamoto University Hospital. Diagnostic categories consisted of probable DLB (n = 55), probable AD (n = 191), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) (n = 16), vascular dementia (VaD) (n = 18), and other/unspecified dementia (n = 37). We evaluated sleep talking in all dementia patients and normal elderly subjects (n = 32) using an originally designed sleep talking questionnaire.

Results: Sleep talking occurred most frequently in the DLB group (61.8%), followed by the VaD group (33.3%), other/unspecified dementia group (27.0%), AD group (18.8%), FTLD group (12.5%), and normal elderly subjects group (6.3%). The prevalence of sleep talking in the DLB group was significantly higher than in other groups, except in the VaD group. The sleep talking yielded high specificity (81.2%) and some sensitivity (61.8%) for the differential diagnosis of DLB from AD. Furthermore, loud sleep talking may improve the specificity (96.9%). For the differentiation of DLB from all other dementia types, the specificity of sleep talking and loud sleep talking was also high (79.4% and 95.8% respectively).

Conclusions: Assessing sleep talking, especially the volume of sleep talking, may be useful in the clinical discrimination of DLB from not only AD but also from all other types of dementia.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2013

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