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Gender differences in clusters of NPS in Dutch nursing homes – a factor analysis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2016

Janny Ho
Affiliation:
Sensire, Care Organization, Varsseveld, the Netherlands
Roland B. Wetzels
Affiliation:
Sensire, Care Organization, Varsseveld, the Netherlands Pleyade, Elderly Care Organization, Arnhem, the Netherlands
Hans Bor
Affiliation:
Department of Primary and Community Care, Centre for Family Medicine, Geriatric Care and Public Health, Radboud University Medical Centre, Nijmegen P.O. Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Sytse U. Zuidema
Affiliation:
Professor of elderly care medicine and dementia, Department of General Practice, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
Corresponding

Abstract

Background:

Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) have a high prevalence among patients with dementia, up to 80%. NPS can be grouped by type and stage of dementia. However, NPS have not previously been grouped by gender. Our objective was to investigate whether NPS cluster differently in men or women in the nursing home patients.

Methods:

Factor analysis to assess the clustering of items in the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) and Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Nursing home version (NPI-NH) into components, for both scales and for gender. Differences in symptom clustering between male and female patients were assessed using a three-step procedure: (1) identifying a gender specific distinctive item, (2) describe the correlation between the distinctive item with any other item in this cluster, (3) testing whether the correlation between a distinctive item and any other item in the cluster (which is present in both sexes) is different for males and females using a general linear model.

Results:

Our database consisted of 1,609 patients. There were five male and three female clusters for NPI-NH and eight male and seven female clusters for CMAI. There were three distinctive items in the NPI-NH and ten in the CMAI.

Conclusions:

There are other clusters of NPS in males and females. Our analysis revealed more significant relations in female than male patients. This might have an implication on the clinical course.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2016 

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