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Dementia care mapping in nursing homes: effects on caregiver attitudes, job satisfaction, and burnout. A quasi-experimental trial

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2017

Martin Nikolaus Dichter*
Affiliation:
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany
Diana Trutschel
Affiliation:
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany Institute of Computer Science, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany
Christian Günter Georg Schwab
Affiliation:
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany
Burkhard Haastert
Affiliation:
mediStatistica, Neuenrade, Germany
Tina Quasdorf
Affiliation:
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany
Margareta Halek
Affiliation:
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany School of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Martin Nikolaus Dichter, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Witten, Germany. Phone: +49 2302 926 253; Fax: +49 2302 926 239. Email: Martin.Dichter@dzne.de.

Abstract

Background:

The Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) method is an internationally recognized complex intervention in dementia research and care for implementing person-centered care. The Leben-QD II trial aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of DCM with regard to caregivers.

Methods:

The nine participating nursing home units were allocated to three groups: (1) DCM method experienced ≥ 1 year, (2) DCM newly introduced during this trial, and (3) regular rating of residents’ quality of life (control group). Linear mixed models were fit to cluster-aggregated data after 0, 6, and 18 months, adjusting for repeated measurements and confounders. The primary outcome was the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire (ADQ) score; the secondary outcomes were the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI).

Results:

The analysis included 201 caregivers with 290 completed questionnaires (all three data collection time points). The ADQ showed a significant time and time*intervention effect. At baseline, the estimated least-square means for the ADQ were 71.98 (group A), 72.46 (group B), and 71.15 (group C). The non-linear follow-up of group A indicated an estimated-least square means of 69.71 (T 1) and 68.97 (T 2); for group B, 72.80 (T 1) and 72.29 (T 2); and for group C, 66.43 (T 1) and 70.62 (T 2).

Conclusions:

The DCM method showed a tendency toward negatively affecting the primary and secondary outcomes; this finding could be explained by the substantial deviation in adherence to the intervention protocol.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2017 

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