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The concept of mild cognitive impairment: a victim of its ubiquity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 November 2018

Cynthia A. Munro
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Baltimore, MD, USA Email: cmunro@jhmi.edu
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Extract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a term used to describe individuals with cognitive impairment that is not severe enough to affect daily functioning (e.g. Petersen, 2004; Winblad et al., 2004). Although MCI has been used to describe cognitive abnormality due to any number of causes that can be progressive, stable, or reversible, it is most often considered to be a transition phase between normal cognition and dementia.

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Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2018 

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References

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