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Clinical validation of the WMS-IV-NL brief cognitive status exam (BCSE) in older adults with MCI or dementia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 July 2014

Zita Bouman*
Affiliation:
Kempenhaeghe, Expertise Centre for Epileptology, Sleep, Medicine and Neurocogntion, Heeze, the Netherlands Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Marc P. H. Hendriks
Affiliation:
Kempenhaeghe, Expertise Centre for Epileptology, Sleep, Medicine and Neurocogntion, Heeze, the Netherlands Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Albert P. Aldenkamp
Affiliation:
Kempenhaeghe, Expertise Centre for Epileptology, Sleep, Medicine and Neurocogntion, Heeze, the Netherlands Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology and School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht, the Netherlands University Hospital Gent, Department of Neurology, Gent, Belgium Technical University Eindhoven, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Signal Processing System Group, Eindhoven, the Netherlands
Roy P. C. Kessels
Affiliation:
Radboud University Nijmegen, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Nijmegen, the Netherlands Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Medical Psychology, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Zita Bouman, MSc Kempenhaeghe Research and Development Sterkselseweg 65 5591 VE Heeze, the Netherlands. Phone: +31402279581. Email: z.bouman@donders.ru.nl.

Abstract

Background:

The Brief Cognitive Status Exam (BCSE) is a new, optional subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale-IV (WMS-IV) developed for rapid detection of cognitive deficits. We examined the clinical validation of the Dutch version of the BCSE in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia, comparing it to the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE).

Method:

BCSE and MMSE were administered in 39 older adults with MCI, 51 with dementia and 96 matched healthy controls.

Results:

Our results show that the BCSE is a valid screening instrument, with psychometric properties similar to the widely used MMSE. High correlations were found between the BCSE and MMSE (r = 0.79, n = 183, p < 0.001). Furthermore, a BCSE cut-off score ≤ 42 revealed a sensitivity of 96% a specificity of 92%, a positive predictive value of 86% and a negative predictive value of 97%, whereas the MMSE cut-off score of ≤ 24 showed values of 84%, 96%, 91%, and 92%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values to detect MCI compared to controls was 81%, 80%, 61%, and 92%, respectively, on the BCSE, with a cut-off score of ≤ 46, and 84%, 76%, 57%, and 92%, respectively, on the MMSE, with a cut-off score of ≤ 27.

Conclusions:

The Dutch version of the BCSE is a clinically valid screening instrument for the detection of cognitive impairment in patients with dementia. Nevertheless, for distinguishing older adults with MCI from healthy controls both the BCSE and MMSE have limitations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2014 

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