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Cholesterol and cognitive performance among community volunteers from the Czech Republic

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2015

Marianne Chanti-Ketterl*
Affiliation:
School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa FL 33612, USA
Ross Andel
Affiliation:
School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa FL 33612, USA
Ondrej Lerch
Affiliation:
Memory clinic, Department of Neurology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Czech Republic
Jan Laczo
Affiliation:
Memory clinic, Department of Neurology, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Motol University Hospital, Czech Republic
Jakub Hort
Affiliation:
International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne's University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic
*
Correspondence should be addressed to: Marianne Chanti-Ketterl, MD, MSPH, School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, 13301 Bruce B. Downs Blvd. MHC 1300, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Phone: +(813) 974-2414; Fax: +(813) 974-9754. Email: mchantik@mail.usf.edu.

Abstract

Background:

Research shows that lipid levels may be associated with cognitive function, particularly among women. We aimed to examine total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and HDL/LDL ratio in relation to cognitive performance, measured with six well-established cognitive domains and a composite cognitive score (CCS).

Methods:

In this cross-sectional study, biomarkers and neuropsychological assessment were available for 141 adults with MMSE scores ≥ 24 (mean age = 69 years, 47% female, mean education = 14.4 years) attending a neuropsychological evaluation. Ordinary least squares regressions were adjusted for age, gender, education, and depressive symptoms in Model 1 and also for apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4) status in Model 2.

Results:

High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was associated with better CCS (β = 0.24; p = 0.014). This association was significant among women (β = 0.30; p = 0.026) and not among men (β = 0.20; p = 0.124). HDL-C was also related to attention/working memory (β = 0.24; p = 0.021), again only among women (β = 0.37; p = 0.012) and not men (β = 0.15; p = 0.271). Adjusting for APOE4 yielded significance for high HDL-C and CCS (β = 0.24; p = 0.022).

Conclusions:

HDL-C was the main lipoprotein affecting cognitive function, with results somewhat more pronounced among women. Research should investigate the possibility of finding ways to boost HDL-C levels to potentially promote cognitive function.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2015 

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