Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-sqtsj Total loading time: 0.375 Render date: 2021-07-25T17:13:56.601Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Can Neuroimaging Techniques Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2005

Cássio M. C. Bottino
Affiliation:
Old Age Research Group (“Proter”), Institute and Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of São Paulo, Brazil
Osvaldo P. Almeida
Affiliation:
Department of Mental Health, Faculty of Medical Sciences, “Santa Casa de São Paulo,” São Paulo, Brazil.

Abstract

Recent studies indicate that neuroimaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography can accurately differentiate patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from elderly controls. This report reviews the results of neuroimaging studies of two at-risk populations: subjects with the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E and those with mild cognitive impairment. The results of the work published to date indicate that the presence of the ε4 allele is a risk factor for AD and that its predictive validity can be enhanced by neuropsychological and/or neuroimaging evaluation. The results also show that patients with mild cognitive impairment display a number of structural and functional imaging abnormalities that are more pronounced in the temporal and parietal lobes. We suggest that the use of neuroimaging techniques can improve the detection of subjects early in the course of AD, although the sensitivity and the specificity of this approach still await a more detailed prospective evaluation.

Type
Aspects of Dementia
Copyright
© 1997 International Psychogeriatric Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Can Neuroimaging Techniques Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Can Neuroimaging Techniques Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Can Neuroimaging Techniques Identify Individuals at Risk of Developing Alzheimer's Disease?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *