Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-bv7lh Total loading time: 0.295 Render date: 2021-06-16T11:18:25.902Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

The psychological and psychosocial impact of the Pakistan Kashmir earthquake after 8 months: a preliminary evaluation by PACTT

PACTT: Pakistan—Aberdeen Collaborative Trauma Team

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

H. Rana
Affiliation:
Military Hospital Rawalpindi
Sohail Ali
Affiliation:
Military Hospital Rawalpindi
Babur Yusufi
Affiliation:
Community Learning Disability Service, Mile End Hospital, London
David A. Alexander
Affiliation:
Aberdeen, Scotland, UK, Aberdeen Centre for Trauma Research, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen
Susan Klein
Affiliation:
Aberdeen Centre for Trauma Research, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen
Amanda J. Lee
Affiliation:
Medical Statistics, Department of General Practice and Primary Care, University of Aberdeen
Gareth T. Jones
Affiliation:
Epidemiology, Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Aberdeen
Gary Macfarlane
Affiliation:
Epidemiology, Epidemiology Group, Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Aberdeen
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Natural disasters are complex events that challenge the coping abilities of individuals and communities (Alexander, 2005). They are characterised by substantial loss, physical injury and economic hardship, as well as by extensive internal displacement and damage to the infrastructure, as exemplified by the Pakistan Kashmir earthquake of 8 October 2005. Measuring 7.6 on the Richter scale, it affected an area of 30000 square miles and a population of 3.6 million. Approximately 90000 were killed, 200000 were injured and 3.5 million were left homeless (Khan, 2006). Based on a literature review and estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Plan of Action for Mental Health and Psychosocial Relief of Earthquake Survivors anticipated high levels of trauma-related psychopathology (Rana et al, 2006).

Type
Original Paper
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2008

References

Alexander, D. A. (2005) Early mental health intervention after disasters. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 11, 1218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Basoglu, M., Salcioglu, E., Livanou, M., et al (2001) A study of the validity of a screening instrument for traumatic stress in earthquake survivors in Turkey. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 14, 491509.Google ScholarPubMed
Basoglu, M., Salcioglu, E. & Livanou, M. (2002) Traumatic stress responses in earthquake survivors in Turkey. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 15, 269276.Google ScholarPubMed
Blake, D. D., Weathers, F. W., Nagy, L., et al (1990) A clinician rating scale for assessing current and lifetime PTSD: the CAPS-1. Behavior Therapist, 13, 187188.Google Scholar
First, M. B., Spitzer, R. L., Gibbon, M., et al (1996) Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV Axis I Disorders – Non-patient Edition (SCIP-I/NP, Version 2). New York State Psychiatric Institute, Biometrics Research Department.Google Scholar
Ghodse, H. & Galea, S. (2006) Tsunami: understanding mental health consequences and the unprecedented response. International Review of Psychiatry, 18, 289297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Karim, S., Saeed, K., Rana, M. H., et al (2004) Pakistan mental health country profile. International Review of Psychiatry, 16, 8392.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Khan, M. M. (2006) Earthquake 2005: challenges for Pakistani psychiatry. International Psychiatry, 3, 2123.Google Scholar
Klein, S. & Alexander, D. A. (2006) Epidemiology and presentation of post-traumatic disorders. Psychiatry, 5, 225227.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klein, S. & Alexander, D. A. (2007) Post-disaster research issues. In The Day the Mountains Moved: Earthquake in Pakistan (ed. Niaz, U.), pp. 233263. SAMA Editorial and Publishing Services.Google Scholar
Mirza, I. & Jenkins, R. (2004) Risk factors, prevalence, and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders in Pakistan: systematic review. BMJ, 328, 794.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rana, M. H., Ali, S., Yusufi, B., et al (2006) National Plan of Action for Mental Health and Psychosocial Relief of Earthquake Survivors – emergency phase. Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal, 56, 402411.Google Scholar
van Ommeren, M., Saxena, S. & Saraceno, B. (2005) Aid after disasters. BMJ, 330, 11601161.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access
Open access
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The psychological and psychosocial impact of the Pakistan Kashmir earthquake after 8 months: a preliminary evaluation by PACTT
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The psychological and psychosocial impact of the Pakistan Kashmir earthquake after 8 months: a preliminary evaluation by PACTT
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The psychological and psychosocial impact of the Pakistan Kashmir earthquake after 8 months: a preliminary evaluation by PACTT
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *