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Prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among the survivors of two suicide bombings in Iraq

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Mohammed J. Abbas
Affiliation:
Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust, UK, email mohdgum@hotmail.com
Amir Fadhil Al Haidary
Affiliation:
Lecturer in Medical College, Karbala University, Iraq
Sabah Alghanimy
Affiliation:
Department of Health, Karbala, Iraq
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The prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and subthreshold PTSD (SPTSD) were measured in 258 survivors of two suicide bombings in Karbala, Iraq, 2 months after the incidents. Of the total sample, 112 (43.4%) had PTSD and 59 (22.9%) had SPTSD. PTSD was more prevalent after the incident that was associated with more civilian deaths.

Type
Research Papers
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists 2013

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