Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-7bjf6 Total loading time: 0.212 Render date: 2021-08-06T03:06:44.076Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Ageing and dementia in developing countries — the work of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Martin Prince
Affiliation:
Epidemiological Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, UK
Daisy Acosta
Affiliation:
Universidad Nacional Pedro Henriquez Ureña (UNPHU), Departamento de Medicina Interna, Seccion de Geriatria, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Alzheimer's Disease International
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Extract

Demographic ageing proceeds apace in all world regions (United Nations, 2003). The proportion of older people increases as mortality falls and life expectancy increases. Population growth slows as fertility declines to replacement levels. Latin America, China and India are experiencing unprecedentedly rapid demographic ageing (Figs 1 and 2).

Type
Thematic Papers — Dementia in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits noncommercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
Copyright © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2006

References

10/66 Dementia Research Group (2000a) Dementia in developing countries. A preliminary consensus statement from the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 1420.3.0.CO;2-8>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10/66 Dementia Research Group (2000b) Methodological issues in population-based research into dementia in developing countries. A position paper from the 10/66 Dementia Research Group. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15, 2130.3.0.CO;2-5>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10/66 Dementia Research Group (2004) Care arrangements for people with dementia in developing countries. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19, 170177.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Choo, W. Y., Low, W. Y., Karina, R., et al (2003) Social support and burden among caregivers of patients with dementia in Malaysia. Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health, 15, 2329.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dias, A., Samuel, R., Patel, V., et al (2004) The impact associated with caring for a person with dementia: a report from the 10/66 Dementia Research Group's Indian network. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19, 182184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ferri, C. P., Ames, D. & Prince, M. (2004) Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia in developing countries. International Psychogeriatrics, 16, 441459.Google ScholarPubMed
Ferri, C. P., Prince, M., Brayne, C., et al (2005) Global prevalence of dementia: a Delphi consensus study. Lancet, 366, 21122117.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fuster, V. & Voute, J. (2005) MDGs: chronic diseases are not on the agenda. Lancet, 366, 15121514.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Herrera, E. Jr, Caramelli, P., Silveira, A. S., et al (2002) Epidemiologic survey of dementia in a community-dwelling Brazilian population. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, 16, 103108.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, S. I., Prince, M., Chiu, M. J., et al (2005) Validity and reliability of a Taiwan Chinese version of the community screening instrument for dementia. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 13, 581588.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nitrini, R., Caramelli, P., Herrera, E. Jr, et al (2004) Incidence of dementia in a community-dwelling Brazilian population. Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders, 18, 241246.Google Scholar
Patel, V. & Prince, M. (2001) Ageing and mental health in a developing country: who cares? Qualitative studies from Goa, India. Psychological Medicine, 31, 2938.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prince, M., Acosta, D., Chiu, H., et al (2003) Dementia diagnosis in developing countries: a cross-cultural validation study. Lancet, 361, 909917.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prince, M., Graham, N., Brodaty, H., et al (2004) Alzheimer Disease International's 10/66 Dementia Research Group – one model for action research in developing countries. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19, 178181.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ramos-Cerqueira, A. T., Torres, A. R., Crepaldi, A. L., et al (2005) Identification of dementia cases in the community: a Brazilian experience. Journal of the American Geriatric Society, 53, 17381742.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shaji, K. S., Smitha, K., Lal, K. Praveen, et al (2002a) Caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a qualitative study from the Indian 10/66 Dementia Research Network. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18, 16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaji, K. S., Kishore, N. R. Arun, Lal, K. P., et al (2002b) Revealing a hidden problem. An evaluation of a community dementia case-finding program from the Indian 10/66 Dementia Research Network. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 17, 222225.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
United Nations (2003) World Population Prospects: The 2002 Revision – Highlights. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
Yusuf, S., Reddy, S., Ounpuu, S., et al (2001) Global burden of cardiovascular diseases. I. General considerations, the epidemiologic transition, risk factors, and impact of urbanization. Circulation, 104, 27462753.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Submit a response

eLetters

No eLetters have been published for this article.
You have Access
Open access
2
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ageing and dementia in developing countries — the work of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Ageing and dementia in developing countries — the work of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Ageing and dementia in developing countries — the work of the 10/66 Dementia Research Group
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *